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17
Dec

About Me

Welcome,

My name is Dr. Recco Richardson, Ph, D. and I am a clinical therapist who specializes in equipping children and teenagers with the tools they need to have more successful, balanced lives. With 20 years of experience, I utilize traditional play therapy methods such as music, coloring books, stuffed animals, and shooting hoops in my office in order to create a safe environment in which children and adolescents are comfortable discussing their concerns and developing behavior modification strategies. As a veteran in the mental health field, I also have over 10 years of supervising experience over aspiring counselors who are seeking an additional degree or certification or over co-workers who report directly to me.

Between both of my offices, one located in Flint, Mi and the other in Clarkston, Mi, I see over 400 clients per month in individual, group, and/or family counseling and I take pride in their personal successes that we achieve together. ADHD, Anger, Bipolar, Oppositional Defiance, Anxiety, Autism, Depression and others are disorders that I am well-acclimated with, able to diagnosis and treat effectively. While these conditions are a part of the children’s lives that I see in counseling, they do not make up the totality of life. Together, my clients and I set measurable goals towards a desired outcome and make action steps accordingly to achieve them. This system of accountability is best seen with me, versus a parent or a sibling, because I serve as an unbiased party who simply listens to the grievances of the client while offering reasonable solutions. 

Whether it is online, over the phone or face to face, your family may be in need of counseling and together, we can improve the environment in your home and provide the social and emotional skills that your family needs. These skills include but are not limited to:

1. Venting properly
2. Accepting discipline
3. Letting things go
4. Getting along with others
5. Avoiding drama
6. Managing anger
7. Parenting defiant children

 

If you’re interested in discussing the next steps for yourself, your child, or your family, please don’t hesitate to reach out to me at reccorichardsonphd@gmail.com.

 

Warmly,

Dr. Recco Richardson, Ph, D.

7
Jan

December 2017

LET & ABLE News

Licensure Education Training & Adolescents for Better Learning Endeavors Programs

A publication of Recco S. Richardson Consulting, Inc. • Recco Santee Richardson, Ph.D., LPC

 

Issue 36 … December 2017

 

Dr. Recco’s Corner

The decision to pursue employment in education, social work, ministry, counseling and government is honorable. It can be viewed as a calling and personal mandate to help others move forward.

    At the core of the stated career paths is a   dedicated soul that longs to make a difference. From where I sit, it is wise to take time to appreciate and thank those who are standing in the gap and making a difference in the lives of others.

As such, I have few words for each called out and mandated service provider. To start with, please know that your decision to invest in clients is appreciated. Next, know that your dedication to your career path is commendable.

    Also know that your on-going sacrifice has not gone unnoticed. And know that your professionalism under pressure speaks volumes about your character.

    In addition, know that your ability to remain inspired is inspirational to others. And lastly, please know that because of you and your efforts, the world is a better place.

 

Recco

 

Children/Teens & Depression

By Recco Santee Richardson, Ph.D., LPC

Introduction

    Depression that is found in children/teens is something that should be taken seriously and addressed. It can interfere with daily living, social functioning and well-being and if not treated, can lead to suicide. Children can experience depression at any age, even soon after birth. In infants and toddlers, depression can manifest in a number of ways including disrupted attachments to care providers, failure to thrive, developmental delays and separation anxiety.

    Depressed children/teenagers live in our neighborhoods, attend our churches, sit in our classrooms, date our children and are members of our immediate family. Depression is a mental health illness that can lie dormant for years. It is no respecter of persons in that it “can and will” show up in any race of people, gender, religion or social class (Patterson, 2011).

    Often childhood/teen years can feature a time of turmoil that is caused by the presence of mood swings and emotional chaos (Paterson, 2011). When attempting to figure out what is going on with their child/teen, the well-equipped and loving parent often wonders what happened to their once sweet child or what is going on with their child.

    When asked, children/teens who suffer from depression have a lot to say. They can be heard saying, “All I want to do is stay locked up in my room” or “No one ever understands me!” These are all statements either made by someone parenting a depressed child or by the actual depressed child themselves.

Defining Childhood/Teen Depression

    All children/teens have days when they feel happier or sadder. They may feel great when their team wins the championship game, when they get a good grade on a test, or when they are having fun at a party.

    They may feel really down when they have an argument with a friend, when their parents say no, or when they don’t get the role in the school play. Normal sadness passes in a reasonable amount of time.

    Depression lasts longer and feels deeper than normal sadness. It may cause children/teens to feel very bad about themselves and their future. It may affect their thoughts, behaviors, appetite, or ability to sleep. Depression may cause reality to be distorted, as if everything is negative and difficult, and problems may appear to be bigger.

How To Overcome Depression

    There are two good and quick ways   children/teens can address their depression.

Realistic Thinking:  To address depression and the associated thinking, it is good to replace the thinking with realistic thinking.

Realistic thinking helps to understand situations, see things clearly as they are, secure a sense of fairness and maintain a balanced way of looking at things.

Problem Solving: For many children/teens, the presence of depression is due to having to face several problems that seem overwhelming.

To address depression, problem solving needs to take place. After all, if you fail to  clearly identify a problem, it is hard to come up with a solution.

One way to identify problems is to pay attention to mood changes through the week. Notice what’s happening when there is a mood change: what were you thinking about, where were you, what happened just before your mood changed?

 

Closing Thoughts

    Though they may experience depression, children/teens can live fulfilled and happy lives. Depression can be dealt with, managed,  addressed and used as fuel to succeed.     The first step is to make a quality decision to no longer be depressed.

One Liner, Life Lines: Teens Helping Teens Make It Another Day (2016)

Book excerpts

    Written from the heart, below are typical American teens’ thoughts and ideas about life, education and their parents/guardians.

When teens speak out and share their feelings, it is not always to tear down others or gripe about what is wrong in their life.

    Sometimes, they just want others to know what they are thinking and what they have been through. They often desire a forum to help others via writing and expressing what they have learned over the years.

 

How We Feel About It

“Born to express, not to impress.” Michael Fischer

“Never say I can’t; always say I can.” Shawntera Fischer

“Life is short; don’t waste it.” Brandon Epps

“When life knocks you down, get up.” Shawntera Fischer

“You create your future.” Vivika Gonzalez

“Go where the wind takes you.” Hannah Pettit

“Quit complaining and do it.” Hannah Pettit

“You are what you make yourself.” Brandon Epps

“Success is for everyone.” Brandon Epps

“Relax and breathe.” Vivika Gonzalez

“A day for firm decisions.” Michael Fischer

“Each day is a chapter in your life story.” Hannah Pettit

“Focus on yourself, not others.” Vivika Gonzalez

“Train your mind to see the good.” Michael Fischer

“Appreciate the things you can’t see.” Michael Fischer

“Honesty is the key to freedom.” Brandon Epps

“Passion is the genesis of genius.” Michael Fischer

“Try your best.” Vivika Gonzalez

“Reading opens doors to new worlds.” Hannah Pettit

“Never give up and never give in.”  Zophieia Gonzalez

“The wise see their own flaws.” Michael Fischer

“Don’t let little things, ruin big things.” Zophieia Gonzalez

 

NCE “Confidence Builder” Workshops

     Our next eight-week National Counselor Exam “Confidence Builder” workshop session begins in January 2018 and ends in February 2018 (see below).

Flint, MI

Sessions begin Sunday January 7, 2018 and will meet eight consecutive Sundays 5 pm to 8 pm (3 hrs). The sessions will take place at Grace Cathedral Community Church, 1709 Nebraska Street, Flint, MI 48506.




100% of our participants passed the NCE on their first try!




    Our instructors are Licensed Professional Counselors (LPC) who have taught master’s level counseling courses and/or are Limited Licensed Professional Counselors (LLPC) who have passed the NCE within the last 3 years.

    For more cost details and additional information you can call: (810) 394- 7815;

visit: https://lsu.clickfunnels.com/register or email: reccorichardsonphd@gmail.com.

 

ABLE Program

    The Adolescents for Better Learning Endeavors (ABLE) Program is designed to help school age youth move forward as a result of gaining new skills and competency.

The goal is for participants to be able to successfully participate within the school setting. The program helps participants improve their academics, social life, emotional maturity and decision-making skills.

 

ABLE Program Components

  • Individual Counseling  
  • Family Counseling            
  • Home Visits
  • Crisis Management
  • Parenting Workshops
  • Incentives & Awards
  • Support Groups
  • Exciting Fieldtrips

Licensure Education Training Program

    Offered by Recco S. Richardson Consulting, Inc., the Licensure Educational Training (LET) Program is an effective supervisory program that targets Limited Licensed Professional Counselors (LLPCs) who need supervision.

Coming LLPC Group Supervision

January 2018

Clarkston: Friday January 26, 2018 (6 pm – 10 pm)

Lansing: Saturday January 27, 2018 (4 pm – 8 pm)

February 2018

Clarkston: Friday February 16, 2018 (6 pm – 10 pm)

Lansing: Saturday February 17, 2018 (4 pm – 8 pm)

LET Services

Group Supervision: Monthly gatherings that review caseloads and discuss trends.

Individual Supervision: As requested, informal one-on-one sessions that provide personal attention and insightful strategies.

Communication: Unlimited monthly communication via phone, email and text.

Other: NCE workshops, counseling residencies, business services support, book

club and scholarly writing/research.

 

Services Offered By RSRC

 

Afterschool Programming 8 Staff Trainings/Development • Business/Entrepreneur Support • Individual/Family Counseling • Research Institute • Book Writing/Publishing       Treatment/Support Groups • Educational Services • Post-Adoption Services • School-Based Initiatives • LLPC Licensure Supervision • Compliance/Regulation • Grant/Proposal Writing • Cultural/Educational Fieldtrips • Youth Programming • Motivational Speaking  Program Development • Conferences/Retreats • NCE Test Workshops

Contact Us

 

Recco S. Richardson Consulting, Inc.      

Recco Santee Richardson, Ph.D., LPC                                           

2500 S Linden Road

P.O Box 321252

Flint, MI 48532                                

(810) 394-7815 (Office)  

(810) 732-6657 (Fax)                                  

Website: richardsonsconsulting.com

Email:reccorichardsonphd@gmail.com

6
Jan

November 2017

LET & ABLE News

Licensure Education Training & Adolescents for Better Learning Endeavors Programs

A publication of Recco S. Richardson Consulting, Inc. • Recco Santee Richardson, Ph.D., LPC

 

Issue 35 … November 2017

 

Dr. Recco’s Corner

    I have been closely watching the behaviors and attitudes of boys ages 6 to 11 for the last several years. I could watch other ages but this one caught my eye for whatever reason.

   I must say, with hopes of not becoming the bearer of bad news, that I’m concerned with this group of boys. Their overall lack of concern for others, inattention to details, privileged mentality, fixation on video games and intentional defiance will change by itself or improve naturally over a period of time. No, that is now how it works!

    At this point, for the majority of the boys, better parenting is not the calling card  solution. In my opinion, unless they take part in intensive treatment, extra-curricular activities, effective mentoring and develop a passion, they are headed for a rock bottom experience and soul wreatching experience that hopefully saves them from what might be a questionable future.

    Like other caring adults, my concern keeps me up late at night trying to figure out, understand and develop interventions that help to resolve the youngsters’ presenting problems. Problems that they and their parents may not be aware of.     

    I’m asking you to join me in reaching out more to this age group. When presented with an opportunity, please take the time to talk with the boys, encourage them to excel, explain life to them and help them however you can. I believe we can make a difference and arrest our concerns.

 

Recco

 

Ingredients Of A Good Proposal For Funding

By Recco Santee Richardson, Ph.,D., LPC

    Over the last 20 years, I have been fortunate to have nearly two dozen proposals accepted and fully financed by various public and private funders. Below are a few key ingredients of my proposals.

Fact Sheet: This sheet summarizes the entire proposal in two pages or less. As one funder told me 15 years ago, “You need to say what you are going to do, early, quickly and concisely because most of us don’t have time to read through a 40 page proposal.”

Sponsoring Agency: I have found that potential funders are interested in knowing more about your organization. A blurb about your history, the mission/vision statement, focus, credentials and number of clients served per year is good information to share.

Goals: Goals are critical to understanding the purpose of the proposed services. It is important for goals to address relevant and currents issues facing the target population.

Number Served: A solid estimation of the number of participants to be serviced is a must. It provides funders with an idea of how many people directly and indirectly will benefit from the proposed services.

Start/End Date: As surely as all good things start, they must also come to an end. So as to reach their own service delivery and financial budget, this information helps funders formulate their plans.

Research/Theoretical Framework: This area is perhaps the most over looked aspect of quality proposal writing. In truth, accurate and essential information is gathered from the research and theory portion of the proposal.  It is critical that the foundation, philosophy of programming and program components be governed by fresh data and current peer-reviewed literature that is less than five years old.   

Program Components: Documentation of which services will be provided should be reported on several times in the proposal. Most funders desire to see upwards of eight program components (services), of which the majority should be face-to-face client services.

Overview of Program Schedule: I have yet to encounter a funder who wasn’t interested in dates, times, locations and format. In other words, they want to see how “everything works together.”  

They want to see how things flow, what the service delivery will look like, scheduling options and where each program component falls within the scheme of things.

Program Budget Narrative: Though it is often over-looked and too skimpy, the budget narrative helps funders visualize things. Among other things, it explains the rationale behind budget items.

Program Budget: The budget may be the most discussed aspect of a submitted proposal. Thus, it needs to be accurate, reasonable and indicated in-kind contributions. Of utmost importance is documentation of services, units of service and cost per unit.

Participant’s Selection: Due to inadequate planning, participant selection is often an area requestors lose points on the proposal’s rubric. In addition to document how participants will be identified, it is necessary to report on systems that will be in place to retain clients, deadlines, client eligibility requirements and outreach efforts.

Program Staffing: With no doubt, there is not a shortage of clients in need of proposed services. As a result, it is wise to document staffing issues such as caseloads, job titles, staff support such as supervision and opportunities for staff development/training.

Objectives/Outcomes: A major mistake, this section of the proposal is often under-developed or breezed over by requestors.

It is a must that program objectives and program outcomes are tightly interwoven in the request for funding, research-based, achievable, measurable and reported on.

Evaluation:  In general, the purpose of the evaluation is to provide systematic and reliable information regarding the on-going operation of the program. Thus proposals for funding should document plans to evaluate the effectiveness and fidelity of services. It is best to for evaluations to be both qualitative and quantitative in nature. It is important to document how the evaluative data will be secured, scored, processed, monitored and reported on.

Criteria for Effectiveness: A report on the criteria for effectiveness can help sway funders in the proposal selection process. This section is when the interventions are reported on along with specific program activities, the desired client attitudes and actions and which competencies/skills will be secured by staff and clients.

References: The finishing touch on an outstanding proposal for services lists out the citations and research used to under-pin the proposal. Each citation and noted theory found in the body of the proposal should be listed as well as other citations and sources used.

 

Business Entrepreneurship & Supervision Training Program (BEST)

    The Business Entrepreneurship & Staff Training (BEST) program is designed to meet the specific training needs of private agencies, out of home placement facilities, corporations, school districts, day care centers and business entrepreneurs.

    At the core of BEST are time tested theories of counseling, traditional human development concepts, research-based frameworks, hands-on activities, practical interventions, self-empowerment and optimum personal performance.

The benefits of BEST are include helping agencies/organizations remain in compliance with yearly training, requirements, workshops/trainings  are cost efficient, on-site sessions,  improved employee morale and effectiveness and much more.

 

BEST’s Program Most Request Topics

 

-Servicing Traumatized Clients   

-Them, They & Us Team Building  

-A Closer Look At Mental Health Disorders

-Maximizing Organizational Behavior

-Child Management Techniques

-Verbal & Non-Verbal De-Escalation

-Millennial Parenting Skills

-Today’s Professional Ethics

-Mentoring & Leadership

-Working With At-Risk Populations

-Effective Behavioral Systems

  Books Written By Recco Santee Richardson, Ph.D., LPC

“Listen To Me: A Journey Into The Expressions of Our Youth.” Recco Santee Richardson, Santee Publication, Flint, MI (2009).

“Parents Helping Children Learn: Your Child Can Earn A’s.” Recco Santee Richardson, Santee Publication, Flint, MI (2010).

“Restorative Recovery Reference Guide: Treatment Strategies For Helping Survivors of Childhood and Adult Sexual Abuse Heal.” Recco Santee Richardson, Santee Publication, Flint, MI (2010).

“Secrets to Great Outcomes For Children From Single-Parent Homes.” Recco Santee Richardson, Recco S. Richardson Consulting, Inc., Flint, MI (2017).

 

Other Books Published By Recco S. Richardson Consulting, Inc.

“AAH!! Moments: Three Teens Thinking Out Loud.” King, Danielle, Cranfill, Jessenia and Greenlee, Najee. Recco S. Richardson Consulting, Inc., Flint, MI (2017).

“ENABLE Us. Urban Students Reflect On Education.” Collins, Nandi, Dubay, Joshua and Spencer, Donnell, Recco S. Richardson Consulting, Inc., Flint, MI (2015).

“One Liner Life Lines: Teens Helping Teens Make It Another Day.” Craft, Amanda, Epps, Brandon, Epps, Bryce, Fischer, Michael, Fischer, Shawntera, Fischer, Undrea, Gonzalez, Ricky, Martin, Candice, Pettit, Hannah, Reed, Yelena, Reed-Gonzalez, Vivika, Reed-Gonzalez, Zopheiea. Recco S. Richardson Consulting, Inc., Flint, MI (2016).




“The growing number of authors is good for our communities”




Scheduled “Confidence Builder” NCE Workshops

     Our next eight-week National Counselor Exam “Confidence Builder” workshop sessions have been scheduled for January 2018 through February 2018. There is limited seating. Registration ends January 1, 2018.

Lansing, MI

Sessions begin Saturday January 6, 2018 and will meet eight consecutive Saturdays         9 am to 12 pm (3 hours). The location is RIY, 913 W. Holmes Road, Lansing, MI 48910

Flint, MI

Sessions begin Sunday January 7, 2018 and will meet eight consecutive Sundays 5 pm to 8 pm (3 hrs). The sessions will take place at   Grace Cathedral Community Church, 1709 Nebraska Street, Flint, MI 48506.





100% of our participants passed the NCE on their first try!




    Our instructors are Licensed Professional Counselors (LPC) who have taught master’s level counseling courses and/or are Limited                   Limited Licensed Professional Counselors (LLPC) who have passed the NCE within the last 3 years.

 

    

    For more cost details and additional information you can call: (810) 394- 7815;

visit: https://lsu.clickfunnels.com/register or email: reccorichardsonphd@gmail.com.

Licensure Education Training Program

Offered by Recco S. Richardson Consulting, Inc., the Licensure Educational Training (LET) Program is an effective supervisory program that targets Limited Licensed Professional Counselors (LLPCs) who need supervision.

 

Coming LLPC Group Supervision

December 2017

Clarkston: Friday December 15, 2017 (6 pm – 10 pm)

Lansing: Saturday December 16, 2017 (4 pm – 8 pm)

 

January 2018

Clarkston: Friday January 26, 2018 (6 pm – 10 pm)

Lansing: Saturday January 27, 2018 (4 pm – 8 pm)

 

LET Services

Group Supervision: Monthly gatherings that review caseloads and discuss trends.

Individual Supervision: As requested, informal one-on-one sessions that provide personal attention and insightful strategies.

Communication: Unlimited monthly communication via phone, email and text.

Other: NCE workshops, counseling residencies, business services support, book

club and scholarly writing/research.

ABLE Program

 

    The Adolescents for Better Learning Endeavors (ABLE) Program is designed to help school age youth move forward as a result of gaining new skills and competency.

The goal is for participants to be able to successfully participate within the school setting. The program helps participants improve their academics, social life, emotional maturity and decision-making skills.

ABLE Program Components

  • Individual Counseling  
  • Family Counseling            
  • Home Visits  
  • Crisis Management
  • Parenting Workshops
  • Incentives & Awards
  • Support Groups
  • Exciting Fieldtrips

 

Services Offered By RSRC

Afterschool Programming • Staff Trainings/Development • Business/Entrepreneur Support • Individual/Family Counseling • Research Institute • Book Writing/Publishing       Treatment/Support Groups • Educational Services • Post-Adoption Services • School-Based Initiatives • LLPC Licensure Supervision • Compliance/Regulation • Grant/Proposal Writing • Cultural/Educational Fieldtrips • Youth Programming • Motivational Speaking Program Development • Conferences/Retreats • NCE Test Workshops

 

Contact Us

 

Recco S. Richardson Consulting, Inc.      

Recco Santee Richardson, Ph.D., LPC                                           

2500 S Linden Road

P.O Box 321252

Flint, MI 48532                                

(810) 394-7815 (Office)  

(810) 732-6657 (Fax)                                  

Website: richardsonsconsulting.com

Email: reccorichardsonphd@gmail.com

6
Jan

October 2017

LET & ABLE News

Licensure Education Training & Adolescents for Better Learning Endeavors Programs

A publication of Recco S. Richardson Consulting, Inc. • Recco Santee Richardson, Ph.D., LPC

 

Issue 34 … October 2017

 

Dr. Recco’s Corner

    On a daily basis, I and many of my fellow mental health counselors, follow political, race and sports current world issues and trends. We do the such so as to be better prepared to respond to a client’s question or past traumatic experience.

    Likewise, I have several colleagues who refuse to follow current world issues. They feel that it is out of the scope of their mental health practice to address a client’s question about such developing trends.

    Most mental health counselors do not spend the day dreaming about becoming the voice of reason for politics and the moral compass. What I hope we do spend time doing is preparing to provide clients with accurate information, frameworks for understanding and effective treatment interventions for when current world issues  knocks at their door.

It is my hope, that when clients entrust us to guide them through current world issues, we will have an adequate understanding of the issues at hand and make a quality decision to help them. Are you ready to answer their questions?

 

Recco

 

Scheduled “Confidence Builder” NCE Workshops

     Our next eight-week National Counselor Exam “Confidence Builder” workshop sessions have been scheduled for January 2018 through February 2018. There is limited seating. Registration ends January 1, 2018.

Lansing, MI

Sessions begin Saturday January 6, 2018 and will meet eight consecutive Saturdays        9 am to 12 pm (3 hours). The location is RIY, 913 W. Holmes Road, Lansing, MI 48910

 

Flint, MI

Sessions begin Sunday January 7, 2018 and will meet eight consecutive Sundays 5 pm to 8 pm (3 hrs). The sessions will take place at   Grace Cathedral Community Church, 1709 Nebraska Street, Flint, MI 48506.




100% of our participants passed the NCE on their first try!




    Our instructors are Licensed Professional Counselors (LPC) who have taught master’s level counseling courses and/or are Limited                   Limited Licensed Professional Counselors (LLPC) who have passed the NCE within the last 3 years.

    For more cost details and additional information you can call: (810) 394- 7815;

visit: https://lsu.clickfunnels.com/register or email: reccorichardsonphd@gmail.com.

 

35 Ways To Immediately Improve Your Life

By Recco Santee Richardson, Ph.D., LPC

 

Take more responsibility

Prepare for disappointments

Select better friends

Surround yourself with inspiration

Choose quality of quantity

 

Be willing to ask for help

Regularly put forth effort

Slow down when necessary

See things for what they are

In all things, be grateful

 

Be a blessing to the elderly

Always believe that you can

Avoid anger at all cost

Be comfortable confronting others

Decide to no longer be a victim

 

Properly process situations

Enjoy the small things in life

Count up the cost daily

Lead by example and deed

Make it a habit to meditate

 

View mistakes as part of life

Seek to understand things

Be yourself no matter what

Embrace what you have

Regularly acknowledge others  

 

Find ways to be helpful

Be considerate and honest

Strive to be a better person

Recognize your season of life

Don’t be afraid of change

 

Try to avoid complaining

Develop your gifts

Place high value on your life

Take care of yourself

Be willing to soar

“Achieving Without Cheating”

By Danielle King, High School Senior Excerpts Part II

 

    If I am being honest, most of the information I obtain during class goes down the drain by the end of summer vacation. So, is there really a difference between a cheater and me? In most cases, teachers cannot tell the difference, especially if a high caliber student is being dishonest.

    In my experience, some of the people I have classes with have gotten amazing SAT scores, without cheating, but have not done 6 percent of the assignments for certain classes the whole year without some form of an answer key. Meanwhile, I do all of the assignments given to me and achieve the same score. There is an obvious disconnect.

    How is it possible that cheating and achieving can be almost synonymous with each other? I know that everyone has a different aptitude, but it shouldn’t be so easy for students to skim by and get the same scores as students who actually put in the work to earn the same grade.

    The primary reason that cheating is so easy is because there is a lack of originality. Teachers have the tendency to not refresh their materials so if a student chooses to keep any materials from courses there is a high chance that material can be subject to transfer from person to person.

    Also, if a teacher chooses to use documents from the Internet, the student can find the answers. I know that creating new assignments every year for students is a lot to ask of a teacher, but there are methods that can be done to help ensure that cheating is at a minimum.

    One way teachers can prevent cheating is to encourage a healthy learning environment. Typically, students believe that cheating is wrong, but they also, in some ways, feel that their only way out is by doing so. Some students feel as if their teachers, or professors, are cheating them by not putting their all into making sure the students are comprehending the material, so in return, the students cheat to receive a grade that they otherwise would not have received.

    In a learning environment, there is a teacher – student agreement. Both parties have to uphold their end of the bargain or the learning of the students and the effectiveness of the teacher will be compromised.

    Instead of cheating, students should voice their concerns with their superior in order to get the learning environment that is necessary for them to thrive. The most obvious of suggestions is to study even if the subject at hand is not the most exciting or is challenging.

    Students should always remember that there is always something to be gained from each class they take. No, I am not saying that every class’s subject will be of use in a literal way, but each experience or situation that a person is put in should result in some sort of change.

    Also, pupils should remember that with every time they cheat, they are cheating themselves out of something that they did not already know.

    Most of the behavioral issues that any student is having can be addressed at home. Parents should talk to their kids about why cheating is wrong and what they could do to help the student reach their potential without copying information wrongfully off the Internet.

     Parents also should set an example for their children by not cheating. For instance, if a parent cheats on their taxes and the child knows, how can the parent really be surprised when they find out that their child is doing the same thing, but just in a different situation?

    Influence is a huge factor in the actions of people, including students. Stopping the cheating epidemic starts at home and is the only way that a student can learn what it means to have integrity, even amongst people who do not.

    Cheating in education is a result of many pieces of a puzzle woven together. There is not just one single factor that impacts the rate of cheating. The main goal when moving a student through life is to cultivate them mentally, as well as build their character: one cannot work without the other.

    I strongly encourage providing the adequate environment where students can flourish so they can be able to impact the global community in a great way.

 

Ivy League Colleges Tour

    From November 10, 2017 to November 13, 2017, the Ivy League Pipeline Program (Pipeline) participants will be visiting Yale, Brown, Columbia and University of Pennsylvania.

    The Ivy Pipeline Program started in 2016, and currently has three former participants enrolled at an Ivy League college. The program is a community-based intensive standardized testing and college acceptance program that targets exceptional learners grades 6th through 11th.

    The program is designed to help students gain admission to Ivy League colleges.      Program activities intend to help students gain additional confidence, take part in practice opportunities, improve standardized scores, write exceptional entrance essays, secure scholarships/financial aid and gain acceptance into an Ivy League college.

    Featuring a charged environment, the program encourages students to excel and soar as a result of intense preparation, additional maturity and high-level dedication to their college plans.

ABLE Program

    The Adolescents for Better Learning Endeavors (ABLE) Program is designed to help school age youth move forward as a result of gaining new skills and competency.

The goal is for participants to be able to successfully participate within the school setting.

    The program helps participants improve their academics, social life, emotional maturity and decision-making skills.

 

ABLE Program Components

 

  • Individual Counseling
  • Family Counseling
  • Home Visits
  • Crisis Management
  • Parenting Workshops
  • Incentives & Awards
  • Support Groups
  • Exciting Fieldtrips

 

Licensure Education Training Program

    Offered by Recco S. Richardson Consulting, Inc., the Licensure Educational Training (LET) Program is an effective supervisory program that targets Limited Licensed Professional Counselors (LLPCs) who need supervision.

 

Coming LLPC Group Supervision

 

November 2017

 

Clarkston: Friday November 17, 2017 (6 pm – 10 pm)

Lansing: Saturday November 18, 2017 (4 pm – 8 pm)

 

December 2017

 

Clarkston: Friday December 15, 2017 (6 pm – 10 pm)

Lansing: Saturday December 16, 2017 (4 pm – 8 pm)

LET Services

 

Group Supervision: Monthly gatherings that review caseloads and discuss trends.

Individual Supervision: As requested, informal one-on-one sessions that provide personal attention and insightful strategies.

Communication: Unlimited monthly communication via phone, email and text.

Other: NCE workshops, counseling residencies, business services support, book

club and scholarly writing/research.

 

Services Offered By RSRC

 

After school Programming • Staff Trainings/Development • Business/Entrepreneur Support • Individual/Family Counseling • Research Institute • Book Writing/Publishing   Treatment/Support Groups • Educational Services • Post-Adoption Services • School-Based Initiatives • LLPC Licensure Supervision • Compliance/Regulation • Grant/Proposal Writing • Cultural/Educational Fieldtrips • Youth Programming • Motivational Speaking Program Development • Conferences/Retreats • NCE Test Workshops

 

Contact Us

 

Recco S. Richardson Consulting, Inc.      

Recco Santee Richardson, Ph.D., LPC                                           

2500 S Linden Road

P.O Box 321252

Flint, MI 48532                                

(810) 394-7815 (Office)  

(810) 732-6657 (Fax)                                  

Website: richardsonsconsulting.com

Email:reccorichardsonphd@gmail.com

21
Dec

September 2017

LET & ABLE News

Licensure Education Training & Adolescentsfor Better Learning Endeavors Programs

A publication of Recco S. Richardson Consulting, Inc. • Recco Santee Richardson, Ph.D., LPC

 

Issue 33 …September 2017

 

Dr. Recco’s Corner

    I have learned several valuable lessons over the years. Some of the lessons were painful, while others were more easily entreated. One of the biggest lessons I have learned is to be competent. In other words, I need to, “Know the facts, know what I’m doing and know what I’m talking about.”  

    To know something is more than being aware or prepared. For me, it means to be aware, well versed, confident and able to articulate critical information at strategic times.

    Because of their lack of knowing, unfortunately, most people that share their opinions are not the best spokesperson on a given topic. They really do not know what they are talking about, and have not performed due diligence to become enlightened.

    As caring adults, working professionals, leaders and defenders of truth and honor, it is our responsibility to speak up and blow the trumpet regarding various topics.

    This same burden, and responsibility, requires us to also, “Know,” on all levels.  Can I, and the rest of the world, depend on you to, “Know?”

 

Recco

 

Lansing Area “Confidence Builder” NCE Workshops

     We are in the process of planning our Lansing area National Counselor Exam “Confidence Builder” workshop sessions.

    You should know that a total of 100% of our participants passed the NCE on their first try. As well, you should know that we would pay the re-test fee for anyone who participates in our workshops that do not pass the exam.

A total of 100% of our participants have passed the NCE on their first try.

    Over an eight-week period, on a weekly basis, participants receive three hours of instruction regarding each content area found on the exam. Please email, or call us for more information.

 

10-Year LLPC Status Limitation

    The Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs currently is reminding Limited Licensed Professional Counselors (Prof. Counselor – Educ. LTD) that there is a limitation on the number of years their limited license may be renewed.

    Administrative Rule 338.1754(5), which took effect on January 1, 2012, provides that a Limited Licensed Professional Counselor  license may be renewed annually, but for no more than 10 years. This limitation affects all individuals that currently hold, or will be issued in the future, a Limited Licensed Professional Counselor (Prof. Counselor – Educ. LTD) license.

“Achieving Without Cheating” By Danielle King, High School Senior -Excerpts-

    In America, we wonder why we are behind other countries in education, and think that it has to do with method, and to some degree that is true, but ideology is what is driving us downward. Simply put, the students here are given so many free passes that it is hindering them from being able to perform at their best. If we want to combat this, we need to figure out ways to combat cheating of all forms in the United States.

    If students are brought up in a society in which cheating, or lying, like in this situation is going to get them ahead, we as a community will continue in a vicious cycle, and before we know it, situations like this one will happen all of the time. Integrity is what our nation is lacking: not brains.

    A lot of the time our students are fully capable of completing tasks, but knowing that they do not have to is what is pulling us down. I know that it is wishful thinking that all of this is going to become perfect, but we should still strive to be better every day by implementing positive behaviors.

   As a result of my previous experiences and other insights, I decided to discuss cheating in the academic and athletic world in regards to students and our society as a whole.

    To understand how huge the issue of cheating is in the United States, we must take a look at how many students are cheating and which of those students are breaking academic integrity.

    According to Best College Reviews (2012), of the 23,000 students who were surveyed in 2012, 51 percent of them admitted to cheating on one or more exams in an academic school year.

    That means, that in a classroom of thirty, about 15 of those students broke academic integrity. These numbers show that the epidemic is far-reaching, and common.

    Cheating used to be simply passing notes or asking the person in front of you for the answer to a specific question. In many cases, a person using these methods gets caught, but technology has made it easier for students to get the answers they need with very little risk of detection.

    In my experience, many of my peers have opted to use group chats to get away with cheating. Obviously, I am not saying that every student that is a part of a group chat is cheating, but cheating is a lot easier in that setting than in the classroom where a teacher is around to monitor the student’s activities.  

 

To Be Continued In Next Month’s Newsletter

Ivy League Colleges Tour

    From November 10, 2017 to November 13, 2017, the Ivy League Pipeline Program (Pipeline) participants will be visiting Yale, Brown, Columbia and University of Pennsylvania.

    The Ivy Pipeline Program started in 2016, and currently has three former participants enrolled at an Ivy League college. The program is a community-based intensive standardized testing and college acceptance program that targets exceptional learners grades 6th through 11th.

    The program is designed to help students gain admission to Ivy League colleges.     Program activities intend to help students gain additional confidence, take part in practice opportunities, improve standardized scores, write exceptional entrance essays, secure scholarships/financial aid and gain acceptance into an Ivy League college.

    Featuring a charged environment, the program encourages students to excel and soar as a result of intense preparation, additional maturity and high-level dedication to their college plans.

ABLE Program

    The Adolescents for Better Learning Endeavors (ABLE) Program is designed to help school age youth move forward as a result of gaining new skills and competency.

The goal is for participants to be able to successfully participate within the school setting.

ABLE Program Components:

  1. Individual Counseling
  2. Family Counseling
  3. Home Visits
  4. Crisis Management
  5. Parenting Workshops
  6. Incentives & Awards
  7. Support Groups
  8. Exciting Fieldtrips

    The program helps participants improve their academics, social life, emotional maturity and decision-making skills.

ABLE Program “Grades Up” Incentive:

   College’s reward students with cash for their excellent grades and so does the ABLE Program. Participants earn $10 for every full grade improved and $50 for earning a 3.00 GPA or higher.

    Since 2014, several dozen students have improved their grades. Participants earn $10 for every full grade improved and $50 for earning a 3.00 GPA or higher.

Licensure Education Training Program

    Offered by Recco S. Richardson Consulting, Inc., the Licensure Educational Training (LET) Program is an effective supervisory program that targets Limited Licensed Professional Counselors (LLPCs) who need supervision.

 

 

LET Services:

Group Supervision: Monthly gatherings that review caseloads, offer Q/A sessions, discuss trends in the field, secure guest speakers, and much more.

Individual Supervision: As requested, informal one-on-one sessions that provide personal attention, intentional brainstorming and insightful strategies.

Communication: Unlimited monthly communication via phone, email and text.

Other: NCE workshops, counseling residencies, business services support, book club and scholarly writing/research.

Coming LLPC Group Supervision:

 

October 2017

Clarkston: Friday October 20, 2017 (6 pm – 10 pm)

Lansing: Saturday October 21, 2017 (4 pm – 8 pm)

 

November 2017

Clarkston: Friday November 17, 2017 (6 pm – 10 pm)

Lansing: Saturday November 18, 2017 (4 pm – 8 pm)

 

Services Offered By RSRC

 

Afterschool Programming • Staff Trainings/Development • Business/Entrepreneur Support • Individual/Family Counseling • Research Institute • Book Writing/Publishing       Treatment/Support Groups • Educational Services • Post-Adoption Services • School-Based Initiatives • LLPC Licensure Supervision • Compliance/Regulation • Grant/Proposal Writing • Cultural/Educational • Fieldtrips • Youth Programming • Motivational Speaking Program Development • Conferences/Retreats • NCE Test Workshops

 

Contact Us

Recco S. Richardson Consulting, Inc.      

Recco Santee Richardson, Ph.D., LPC                                           

2500 S Linden Road

P.O Box 321252

Flint, MI 48532                                

(810) 394-7815 (Office)  

(810) 732-6657 (Fax)                                  

Website: richardsonsconsulting.com

Email:reccorichardsonphd@gmail.com

21
Dec

August 2017

LET & ABLE News

Licensure Education Training & Adolescents for Better Learning Endeavors Programs

A publication of Recco S. Richardson Consulting, Inc. • Recco Santee Richardson, Ph.D., LPC

 

Issue 32 … August 2017

 

Dr. Recco’s Corner

 

    At the top of my lungs, I feel like screaming, “Just focus on helping someone.” So many people today are looking for answers, help, and support. They are reaching out, crying out, seeking high and low, and looking for a way out. However, while all of this is going on with them, qualified and capable help seems to be busy discussing things that really don’t matter.

     I mean, does it really matter to those that are hurting if you utilize psychotherapy in counseling sessions instead of trauma focused cognitive behavior therapy? Do clients really care if we are Baptist, Methodist, Catholic, Muslim or Buddhist? When in a bind, do clients wonder or care if we have a Masters in Counseling, a Master’s in Psychology or a Master’s in Social Work?

     The answer to all of the above stated questions is, “No.” What clients do care about is simple. They care about if we truly care about them. They care about if we treat them with respect and dignity during their time of need.

     As service providers, let’s focus on doing a better job of helping our clients. Focus later on all of the other stuff that serves as a distraction.

 

Recco

 

 

“A Closer Look” Mental Health & Service Provider’s Conference

 

   The 3rd Annual, “A Closer Look,” Mental Health & Service Provider’s Conference will be held Friday September 22, 2017 at the Conference Center, Ramada Hotel          (Lansing, MI).

   The theme is Traumatized Clients: Clinical Treatment Interventions That Strengthens Emotional Intelligence & Builds Resilience.Presenters will share information, interventions and practical insight regarding trauma, grief/loss, suicide prevention, treatment planning and emerging trends and other relevant topics.     

 

Education Training Hours

Social Work: A total of four (4) social work education hours has been approved by the Michigan Social Work Continuing Education Collaborative.

Counseling: The Traumatized Clients: Clinical Treatment Interventions That Strengthens Emotional Intelligence & Builds Resilience workshop session has been approved by National Board of Certified Counselors for four (4) NBCC credits. Sessions approved for NBCC are clearly identified.Recco S. Richardson Consulting, Inc.  is solely responsible for all aspects of the program. NBCC approval number SP: 2911

 

New Book Published!

This month, Recco Richardson Consulting, Inc. will release a new book that is titled  AAH!!Moments, 3 Teens Thinking Out Loud. The writings are a collection of three books combined into one publication.

The individual books are: Achieving Without Cheating, by Danielle King, Get Smart, by Jessenia Cranfill and A Literature Review of The History of Music in America, by Najee Greenlee.

 

Achieving Without Cheating By Danielle King

    Danielle, Jessenia and Najee are straight A high school students, and are intelligent. What seems to be their academic foundation is their quest to be the best at whatever they do. They have gained the ability to appreciate the small things in life, and to take on challenges. This brings out the best in them, and continues to set them apart.

     It is held that all children can learn, some children learn differently, and some children use various skills when challenged to comprehend. However, not all children excel academically. Surely, not all of them score in the 90th percentile on standardized tests. The authors’ writings give us a peek into how they approach life, their mindset regarding problems, how they interact with family members, and what helps them manage stress.

 

Get Smart: A “How To” On Keeping Your Grades Up By Jessenia Cranfill

      We could learn a lot from the authors and other teens that score in the top percentile. Learning from the authors is the purpose and focus of this book. Another purpose of the book is fundraising. The authors keep 100 percent of the proceeds from book sales for their college visits and associated fees.

 

A Literature Review of The History of Music in America By Najee Greenlee

Parents, educators and other students need to know and be sure about the learning process. The teen writers of this book, walk us through their lives, thoughts and perceptions regarding education, parenting and history. Their perceptions and beliefs lead them to explore their world, understand themselves and prepare for their future.

 

Youth & Young Adult Suicide Prevention/Intervention

Recco Santee Richardson, Ph.D., LPC

 

Definition & Statistics

   Traumatized clients can be tempted to contemplate suicide. Suicide is the intentional taking of one’s own life. For youth ages 10-24, suicide is one of the leading causes of death. In 2014, The Centers for Disease Control & Prevention reported that 157,000 youth and young adults received medical care from self inflicted suicide attempt injuries.

    In a 2014 nation-wide study of 14-24 year-olds, 16 percent stated they seriously considered suicide, 13 percent reported creating a plan and 8 percent of students reported having attempted suicide before. The most common method of youth suicide is firearms (45 percent), suffocation (40 percent) and poisoning (8 percent). For youth/young adults, more females attempt suicide and upwards of 84 percent of suicides are committed by males.

Factors

   According to WebMD (2014) there are several factors that contribute to suicide attempts and prevention efforts. The risk factors for attempts are below.

 

Suicide Risk Factors

  • Previous Attempt Abuse/Neglect
  • Depression Substance Abuse
  • Stressful Life Easy Access
  • Incarceration Confusion
  • Family Problems Hopeless Feelings
  • Financial Strain Relationship Loss
  • Low Support System Physical Illness

 

Protective Factors

  • Treatment Restricted Access
  • Family Support Community Support
  • Problem Solving Coping Skills
  • Religious Beliefs Cultural Values

 

Suicide Signs & Warnings

To help youth/young adults avoid suicidal ideations, it is important that we all are aware of the signs and warnings.

Below are a few signs and warnings:

Depression/Sadness: Nearly 75 percent of teens who commit suicide previously reported feeling depressed.

Talks About Death: Jokes, casual remarks, references and review of recent deaths.

Has A Real Plan: Where they would do it, how they would do it and why they would do it.

Expresses No One Cares: Nobody likes me, I don’t trust anyone and I don’t fit in.

Behaviors Change: Out of character, clothing and music changes, personal image, and social concerns.

Low Interest & Isolation: Nothing excites, no fun, boredom and it doesn’t matter.

Sleep Pattern Changes: Too much/too little sleep, can’t sleep and trouble staying asleep.

Poor Concentration/Focus: Trouble remembering things and stop reading.

Declining Grades: Tardiness, low interest, poor test scores and easily distracted.

Level  Of Complaining Increases: Conflict with friends, school problems and adult problems.

Eating Habits Change: Stop eating meat, eat mostly sweets and become calorie & fat content focused.

Reckless Behaviors: Drug usage, double dare, sexualized, stealing and running away.

Gives Away Valuables: Collectables, jewelry, video games, hats and clothes.

On-line Glamorization: Normalize pains, wrong philosophies and false reports.

 

LET Program

    Offered by Recco S. Richardson Consulting, Inc., the Licensure Educational Training (LET) Program is an effective supervisory program that targets Limited Licensed Professional Counselors (LLPCs) who need supervision.

 

LET Services:

Group Supervision: Monthly gatherings that review caseloads, offer Q/A sessions, discusses trends in the field, secures guest speakers and much more.

Individual Supervision: As requested, informal one-on-one sessions that provide personal attention, intentional brainstorming and insightful strategies.

Communication: Unlimited monthly communication via phone, email and text.

Other: NCE workshops, counseling residencies, business services support, book club and scholarly writing/research.

Please contact our office if you are in need of LLPC supervision.

 

 

Coming LLPC Group Supervision

September 2017

All cohort supervision sessions will take place Friday September 22, 2017 during the, “A Closer Look” Mental Health & Service Providers’ Conference. Additional make-up supervision hours will be available during the entire weekend.

 

Contact Us

 

Recco S. Richardson Consulting, Inc.      

Recco Santee Richardson, Ph.D., LPC

2500 S Linden Road, P.O Box 321252 .. Flint, MI 48532

(810) 394-7815 (Office)  (810) 732-6657 (Fax)                                  

website: richardsonsconsulting.com

email:reccorichardsonphd@gmail.com

 

20
Dec

July 2017

LET & ABLE News

Licensure Education Training & Adolescents for Better Learning Endeavors Programs

A publication of Recco S. Richardson Consulting, Inc. • Recco Santee Richardson, Ph.D., LPC

 

Issue 31 …July 2017

 

Dr. Recco’s Corner

    I want to remind everyone that it is okay to encourage others. For some reason, the majority of us find it hard to let others know how well they are doing and how close they are to reaching their goals. I guess human nature prevails and convinces us to not let others know that they can make it another day and that things will get better. Yes, they will get better!

   While there is something fundamentally wrong with, “Brown noising and sucking-up,” to a person, there is nothing wrong with rendering inspired encouragement when it is warranted and the right the to do. We should not have to ponder or pray about doing the right thing. Right is right.

    Not only have we become comfortable with not encouraging others, we have also convinced ourselves that we do not need encouragement from others.  This is not good. Everyone needs to be encouraged by others.

    Today, I’m personally challenging you to put forth an effort to encourage at least one person each day. It will cost you nothing and it will eventually benefit you. Try it!

 

Recco

 

Helping Male Teens Avoid Crime (Pt III)

By Recco Santee Richardson, Ph.D., LPC & Jeanette Owens, MA, LLPC 

• Continued from last month’s newsletter •

     With no doubt, effective parenting helps minors avoid participation in criminal activity. It is held that children need parenting efforts that are consistent and attempt to maintain control. Children also need close supervision, rewards, consequences, and parent disapproval of antisocial behavior.

     Reed & Reed (1997) reported that children of incarcerated parents are adversely affected in that the family system is harmed. The temporary and long-term loss of a parent due to incarceration can sting a child/adolescent in a deep emotional way. The sting has the ability to penetrate and distract the fundamental belief system, values that are held near and dear to the heart and chemical balance.  

    To help children/adolescents deal with the incarceration of a parent and avoid future involvement in criminal activity, affective and physiological and attention and behavioral dysregulation needs to take place.

     Below is a list of problems that the children/adolescents experience and specific interventions that can be used by adults and minors to address the problems (Kolk et al. 2009).  

  1. Modulate, Tolerate and Recover: Children of incarcerated/previously incarcerated parents often display the inability to modulate. For some reason,           they can’t calm down, have regular negative moods, present themselves asbeing hyper, fail to self-soothe at critical times and are given to anger.  

     

      To address the stated, it is imperative that there is minimum exposure to interpersonal violence and consistent parenting that protects. As well, it is helpful to ensure that the child/adolescent avoids emotional abuse, is confronted when he/she has a tantrum and learns to tolerate differences.

     In addition, the child/adolescent need to be instructed as to how to mobilize and organize things and maintain a routine sleep pattern. Likewise, he/she is in need of consistent healthy meals, proper personal hygiene/elimination and exposure to positive concepts.

     Lastly, it is beneficial if the child/adolescent experiences soothing and stimulating sounds and develops the ability to create systems and process during routine interactions.

  1. Disturbances in Regulation of Body Functions: It can be expected that at some point the children/adolescents of an incarcerated parent will experience disrupted sleep, have eating problems, report digestive struggles, have an overall poor response, be given to being stressed and be very sensitive.   

 

       To address the above mentioned, it is important that the child/adolescent have consistent healthy meals and proper personal hygiene/elimination. In addition, he/she should learn how to respond to positive touch and feel.  

  1. Awareness of Emotions and Body States: The children/adolescents often depersonalize and are not aware of their external world. Their move toward affective numbing, dissociation, inability to describe their emotions, fears, inadequate communication of their desires is not healthy.  

 

       There are several practical things that can help children/adolescents experience success in their emotions and body states. They should learn to emote, label feelings and identify their emotional triggers. In addition, efforts should be made to be more aware of their surroundings and to experience incidental learning.

       They should also be encouraged to be observant and to develop good listening skills. Lastly, they should be instructed as to how to perceive, problem solve and resolve conflicts.

  1. Threats, Misread Danger and Relational Dysregulation: For the most part, all children/adolescents have a need to feel safe. It is held that in many cases, children/adolescents of incarcerated and/or previously incarcerated parents have a tainted perception of safety. They can become pre-occupied with the detection of  a threat and experience persistent social fears.

     On a regular basis, they may misread social context, display narrow focus and have inadequate shifts of awareness of surroundings. In addition, they can become pre-occupied with their caregiver and have attachment problems.    

     There are several remedies for the above mentioned. The removal of threats and intimidators should take place. There should also be efforts to ensure their safety and ongoing instruction on how to identify dangers and the associated cues. It is also helpful to teach the child/adolescent how to protect his/her emotions and experience regular stimulation.

     He/she should be introduced to positive rhythms and beats and taught the benefits of intentional movement. The child/adolescent should also receive instruction as to how to properly release emotions, manage stress and gain victory over sexual desires.

  1. Impaired Self-Protection and Thrill Seeking: The incarceration of a parent can have a lasting and very deep impact on a child’s/adolescent’s sense of self and thrill seeking. They have a propensity to be subject to risk-taking behaviors, fire starting and misplaced sexuality.

       They also tend to pursue activities that are not age appropriate, are impulsive and display poor judgment. Lastly, they tend to not follow rules, have poor planning and fail to anticipate consequences.

      To address the problem areas, the child/adolescent must experience goal attainment and have meaningful achievement. He/she also needs self-fulfillment, confidence, selfmastery and an array of self-soothing activities such as rocking, singing and writing.

    The child/adolescent should also learn to set goals, regularly explore his/her personage and be exposed to various cultures.

  1. Maladaptive Attempts at Self-Soothing/Reactive Self-Harm: Due to their level of emotional pain, abandonment and embarrassment, children/adolescents of convicts and felons can be given to masturbating, rocking, self-harm and substance abuse.

 

      They are also at risk of suicide attempts, cutting or hitting themselves, picking their skin, burning themselves, self-mutilation, plucking their eyelashes, and other self-injurious behaviors (Richardson & Owens 2011).

      To help children/adolescents who struggle in this area, efforts should be made for them to understand their stressors, experience self-love and recognize the dangers of drugs. They should make efforts to experience natural highs and positive thoughts.

  1. Sense of Self, Self-Loathing and Trust Issues: The incarceration of a parent can affect a child’s/adolescent’s self-worth and personal confidence. It can also cause guilt, worry, damaged feelings and an overall distrust of others.

 

    In some situations and way too often, it can lead to noncompliance, aggressiveness, shame and poor boundaries.

    There are several concepts that can help children/adolescents avoid self-loathing and limited trust. They can be introduced to projects, join a club, organize activities or become task-oriented.

     They can also decide to become more responsible, seek to avoid disappointment, remain optimistic and secure healthy relationships. Efforts should also be made to manage their negative emotions and respect boundaries.

    What needs to take place at this time is a concerted effort by law officials, educators, parents and youth to embrace positive living outcomes, structured and defined outcomes, holistic approaches to problem solving, sensitivity to the unique needs of today’s families and community-based support.

 

“A Closer Look” Mental Health & Service Provider’s Conference

    The 3rd Annual, “A Closer Look,” Mental Health & Service Provider’s Conference will be held Friday September 22, 2017 at the Conference Center, Ramada Hotel (Lansing, MI).

    The theme is Traumatized Clients: Clinical Treatment Interventions That Strengthens Emotional Intelligence & Builds Resilience.Presenters will share information, interventions and practical insight regarding trauma, grief/loss, suicide prevention, treatment planning and emerging trends and other relevant topics.     

    A total of four (4) continuing education hours has been approved  by the Michigan Social Work Continuing Education Collaborative. Pending “A Closer Look” Conference CE Credits. We await and anticipate approval from additional state and national counseling initiatives/organizations that offer continuing education

 

25 Truths About Purpose, Driven & Successful People

By Recco Santee Richardson, Ph.D., LPC

     Some 25 years, thousands and thousands of clients and 15 published books later, I have come to realize something about people who are walking in their purpose and who have achieved a measure of success in several areas of their lives.

     For the most part, these individuals are ordinary people from ordinary backgrounds. I figure now is a good time to share with the world the 25 truths I have learned and now understand about the stated individuals.

  1. When life deals them a bad hand, they  make something out.
  2. Regardless of the task, their goal is to do their best.
  3. They see the glass as half full, not half empty.
  4. They avoid waiting for things and people.
  5. They tend to be doing something at all times.
  6. They finish things.
  7. They quit, “Quitting,” a long time ago.
  8. By habit, they bounce back from mistakes quickly.
  9. They rarely (if ever) blame others.
  10. They tend to have a plan and a back-up plan to the back-up plan.
  11. They have a small circle of friends.
  12. They have a large network of like-minded peers.
  13. Their skills, trade or job satisfies them emotionally, socially, spiritually and financially.
  14. They regularly teach others what they know.
  15. They like challenges.
  16. They regularly take calculated risks.
  17. They read, meditate and listen much more than they talk, eat and sleep.
  18. They view failure as part of the learning process.
  19. They turn road blocks into stepping stones towards success.
  20. At critical times, they tend to keep their emotions in check.
  21. They are problem solvers, not problem makers.
  22. They have figured out how to get along with difficult people.
  23. They accept that everyone will not like them.
  24. They can be very demanding on themselves.
  25. They don’t expect others to understand them.

 

 

Dr. Recco’s Thoughts To Live By

 

Personal action leads to satisfaction.

Stop waiting and do something now.

Happy people make tough decisions.

Leadership means to lead,

Be sure to find the hope in situations.

Any day above the ground is a good day.

Daily preparation is critical to success.

Accept patience for what it is.

Mentoring is necessary and works.

Think long and hard as often as needed.

Maximize your time and season of life.

 

ABLE Program

    The Adolescents for Better Learning Endeavors (ABLE) Program is designed to help at-risk school age youth move forward as a result of gaining new skills and competency.

     The goal is for participants to be able to successfully participate within the school setting. The program helps participants improve their academics, social life, emotional maturity and decision-making skills.To secure ABLE programming simply contact our office.

 

3rd Annual  Youth “Improve Your Academic Life” Conference

     Our 3rd annual, “Improve Your Academic Life,” Conference will be held Friday September 1, 2017 and Saturday September 2, 2017 at Covenant Hills Resort & Camp (Otisville, MI)

     The event targets students ages 12 to 17 and will feature workshops on study skills, test taking, staying organized, avoiding distractions and peer interaction.

      Participants will be housed over-night at the facility and will also take part in several  social/recreational activities, meals and panel discussions with current college students and various working professionals.

Services/Program Offered By RSRC

 

Agency Clinical Directorship (new) • Afterschool Programming • Staff Trainings/Development • Business/Entrepreneur Support • Individual/Family Counseling  Research Institute • Book Writing/Publishing • Treatment/Support Groups • Educational Services • Post-Adoption Services • School-Based Initiatives • LLPC Licensure Supervision Compliance/Regulation • Grant/Proposal Writing • Cultural/Educational Fieldtrips • Youth Programming • Motivational Speaking • Program Development • Conferences/Retreats NCE Test Workshops

 

LET Program

      Offered by Recco S. Richardson Consulting, Inc., the Licensure Educational Training (LET) Program is an effective supervisory program that targets Limited Licensed Professional Counselors (LLPCs) who need supervision.

 

LET Services:

 

Group Supervision: Monthly gatherings that review caseloads, offer Q/A sessions, discusses trends in the field, secures guest speakers and much more.

Individual Supervision: As requested, informal one-on-one sessions that provide personal attention, intentional brainstorming and insightful strategies.

Communication: Unlimited monthly communication via phone, email and text.

Other: NCE workshops, counseling residencies, business services support, book club and scholarly writing/research.

Please contact our office if you are in need of LLPC supervision.  Currently, LET programming is offered in Bay City, Flint, and Lansing.

 

 

Coming LLPC Group Supervision

 

August 2017

Bay City: Saturday, August 15, 2017 (9 am – 1 pm)

Lansing: Saturday, August 15, 2017 (4 pm – 8 pm)

Flint: Sunday, August 16, 2017 (1 pm – 5 pm).

 

September 2017

All cohort supervision sessions will take place Friday September 22, 2017 during the “A Closer Look” Mental Health & Service Providers’ Conference. Additional make-up supervision hours will be available during the entire weekend.

 

 

Contact Us

 

Recco S. Richardson Consulting, Inc.      

Recco Santee Richardson, Ph.D., LPC

2500 S Linden Road, P.O Box 321252 .. Flint, MI 48532

(810) 394-7815 (Office)  (810) 732-6657 (Fax)                                  

website: richardsonsconsulting.com

email:reccorichardsonphd@gmail.com

 

20
Dec

June 2017

LET & ABLE News

Licensure Education Training & Adolescents for Better Learning Endeavors Programs

A publication of Recco S. Richardson Consulting, Inc. • Recco Santee Richardson, Ph.D., LPC

 

Issue 30 … June  2017

 

Dr. Recco’s Corner

    Sometimes gentle, yet intentional reminders are needed. They help us stay on task, protect what we value and put us in life for favor. I humbly submit a few reminders that are worth mentioning.  

    Firstly, we must keep the spirit of volunteerism alive in our homes and communities. Volunteerism is foundational to American history and to the future of our collective strength. Everyone should embrace volunteerism, for it promotes service to others and selflessness.

    Secondly, we must find our purpose. Abuse happens when the purpose of a thing/object is not understood. Purpose has the ability to fulfill our soul and create opportunities for us and others.

    Thirdly, we must avoid making excuses. For some reason we become fixed on what happened, why we can’t and who did what.      Regardless of the situation at hand, we should remember that where there is a will, there is a way. Indeed, nothing is impossible to him that believes.

    In closing, gentle reminders often come at the right time.

 

Recco

 

 

Helping Male Teens Avoid Crime (Pt II)

By Recco Santee Richardson, Ph.D., LPC & Jeanette Owens, MA, LLPC

•Continued from last month’s newsletter•

    Criminal behavior (also referred to as antisocial behavior) is defined as an overall lack of adherence to the social morals and standards that allow members of a society to coexist peaceably. For children/adolescents the behaviors equate to delinquency that can trigger adulthood arrest, conviction or incarceration.

    Their poor mental health status, subsequent behaviors, propensity for violence and involvement in criminal activities can be traced back to environment, inconsistent parenting, lack of natural consequences, academic underachievement and genetics.  As a result, at an increasing rate children/adolescents are following in the footsteps of their birth parent, including becoming involved in criminal activities.

    For some families, there appears to be a cycle of incarceration and a life of crime. In order to break the cycle of incarceration, specific interventions that help keep the children/adolescents from becoming offending adults must take place.

     In most communities and instances when a parent is arrested and eventually incarcerated, there is little to no mental health intervention offered to their children that addresses the experienced loss, fear, trauma and abandonment.

 

“To avoid criminal activities, our young males need early interventions.”

-Dr. Recco

    Simmons (2000) reported that children of arrested and incarcerated parents face unique difficulties. Because not much is known in the research about children of incarcerated parents, they seem to be falling through the cracks. The responses to their parent’s incarceration can move them towards anxiety, fear, anger, sadness, depression, guilt, school failure, trauma, low esteem, truancy and/or use of alcohol/drugs.

    Kolk et al. (2009) researched the experiences of children who have incarcerated/previously incarcerated parents. They coined the children’s experiences as Developmental Trauma Disorder (DTD). DTD captures the reality of clinical presentations of children/adolescents who have been exposed to dysfunctional family living, chronic interpersonal trauma, interpersonal violence, unsafe environments, maltreatment and inadequate care giving systems.

    To help children/adolescents address their DTD (and thus avoid crime), the emphasis cannot just be on their behaviors. Rather, sufficient focus must be placed on recognizing the presence of interpersonal trauma, lack of safety and developmental disruptions.

    From a mental health perspective, DTD can look like and plays out as trauma, anxiety, worry, phobic fears, defiance, anger, aggression, suicide attempts, mood swings, depression and panic.  

     As well, from an educational perspective, DTD can look like and play out as poor school attendance, low performance on standardized tests, regular behavior referrals, learning disabilities, suspensions, poor peer interactions, isolation, poor judgment and lack of effort.

 

Solutions & Interventions That Address Criminality

 

     Sexton (2010) reported that the family unit and Functional Family Therapy (FFT) have the ability to help families and at-risk adolescents who are involved in the court system. Functional Family Therapy is an outcome-driven prevention/intervention program for youth who have demonstrated a range of maladaptive, acting out behaviors, poor attitudes, inadequate social skills, underdeveloped conflict resolution skills and related issues.

    As a solution and intervention, parents and children/adolescents can modify and incorporate concepts of FFT into their daily living. The modifying of the concepts is the responsibility of the parent and the minor, with each taking an active and personal role in implementing the information. Daily living FFT concepts are:

Stop Family Cycle of Crime: At some point, the cycle of crime must be broken. For this to take place, the parent/legal guardian (and minor) should avoid interaction and contact with individuals who participate in illegal activities. The avoidance can protect from unplanned pregnancies, unnecessary peer pressure, crisis/trauma, dependence, poor role modeling and low motivation.

Promote School Attendance/Participation: To ensure learning and development, children must attend school consistently. The recent years have witnessed children/adolescents in some communities having 10 to 30 unexcused school absences each academic year. Parents and legal guardians must be home and active in preparing their child physically (e.g., proper sleep, breakfast), emotionally (e.g., calm, content, confident), and socially (e.g., accepting of others, agreeable, compliant) for the school day.

Make Good Use of Free Time: Idle time continues to be the playground of counterproductive behaviors. The engagement in sports, clubs, hobbies and special interest groups is critical to families and minors avoiding criminal activities. Child/adolescents need to be active and must make good use of their time.

Secure Gainful Employment: The lack of adequate household income and/or poor financial management can encourage children/adolescents (and adults) to participate in anti-social behaviors that lead to illegal activities. To have success in this area, adults and children need to improve their financial skills, prepare themselves to gain additional employment skills, take advantage of community-based employment resources and network effectively.

Develop Healthy Relationships: Interaction and commonality with the wrong crowd can quickly steer adults and children in the wrong direction. To offset this youth should develop healthy relationships. Healthy relationships feature positive support, ongoing inspiration, opportunities to grow as a person, personal identity and exposure to the larger society. Unhealthy relationships feature hitting, regular put downs, intimidation, fear, promote isolation and cause discomfort. These types of relationships should be ended immediately.

Safe and Adequate Housing: It is understood that the current recession and economic state of America can cause individuals to live in unsafe and inadequate housing. However, it remains the responsibility of the parent/legal guardian (and minors) to make every effort to promote quality living conditions, regardless of where they live.

 

“The actual neighborhood or housing is not the problem.”

-Dr. Recco

    The actual neighborhood or housing is not the problem. Rather, the problems that lead to youth criminal activities are rooted in the philosophies and unmet needs of adults and children/adolescents who live in the community.

Substance Abuse Avoidance/Education: The presence of criminal activity by adults and minors usually involves substance abuse (e.g., marijuana, alcoholic beverages, narcotics). This increases the likelihood of anti-social behaviors and problems. For these and other reasons, everyone in the home should make a commitment to avoid illegal substance usage. By means of substance abuse education, better decisions can be made and avoidance of criminal activities can take place.

Address Mental Health Issues: Adults and children/adolescents can experience abuse/neglect that has a negative effect on their emotions and behaviors (Richardson & McGowan, 2010). One way to address this is to participate in counseling. Counseling can help individuals experience emotional healthiness and promote behavioral changes.

Effective Parenting: With no doubt, effective parenting helps minors avoid participation in criminal activity. It is held that children need parenting efforts that are consistent and attempt to maintain control. Children also need close supervision, rewards, consequences, and parent disapproval of antisocial behavior.

 

• Article to be continued next month•

 

 

“A Closer Look” Mental Health & Service Provider’s Conference

    The 3rd Annual “A Closer Look” Mental Health & Service Provider’s Conference will be held Friday September 22, 2017 in Lansing, MI.

   The theme is Traumatized Clients: Clinical Treatment Interventions That Strengthens Emotional Intelligence & Builds Resilience. Presenters will share information, interventions and practical insight regarding trauma, grief/loss, suicide prevention, treatment planning and emerging trends and other relevant topics.

    It is anticipated that four to seven (4-7) continuing education hours will be approved  by several professional certification boards. More conference details will be provided soon. For this state-wide conference, a call for presenter’s communication will be sent out soon.

 

NEW!! Clinical Director Services Now Offered

 

RSRC now offers Clinical Director services to small counseling clinics. The focus of services is:

  1. Attracting new clients
  2. Development of policies and procedures
  3. Marketing and advertising efforts
  4. Staff development/training
  5. Clinical meetings and supervision
  6. Effective case, chart and file reviews/audits

 




Let our 25 years of clinical experience help you!




ABLE Program

    The Adolescents for Better Learning Endeavors (ABLE) Program is designed to help at-risk school age youth move forward as a result of gaining new skills and competency.

    The goal is for participants to be able to successfully participate within the school setting. The program helps participants improve their academics, social life, emotional maturity and decision-making skills.

    For the second year in a row, our data reports that 72 percent of ABLE Program participants increase their grade point average, decrease their number of behavioral referrals and attend school more regularly.

    To secure ABLE programming simply contact an administrator in your school district.

25 Business “Truths” To Live By

By Recco Santee Richardson, Ph.D., LPC

 

Be 10 times better than the competition.

Loyalty is an idea, not a law.

Pay your staff well and consistently.

Your funding sources have a short life span.

Have faith and be willing to jump.

 

Regularly invest in your business.

Don’t expect others to understand or care.

Familiar problems stem from weak systems.

The answer usually is right before your eyes.

Learn to be productive when others are not.

 

Address things that waste your time.

Take care of yourself today and tomorrow.

Expand your vision, not theirs.

Everything is connected to everything.

Outsource when you don’t have the skill set.

 

View criticism as a growth opportunity.

The customer is still always right.

Let your imagination create your future.

Be willing to share and give to others.

Always have a plan B, C, D and E.

 

Set the tone early and often.

Listen more than you talk.

Promote accountability and structure.

Be available to your staff and clients.

Enforce deadlines, rules and procedures.

 

“In business, who you know, what you know and how you do it matters”

-Dr. Recco

 

Services/Program Offered By RSRC

Agency Clinical Directorship (new) • Afterschool Programming • Staff Trainings/Development • Business/Entrepreneur Support • Individual/Family Counseling  Research Institute • Book Writing/Publishing• Treatment/Support Groups • Educational Services • Post-Adoption Services • School-Based Initiatives • LLPC Licensure Supervision Compliance/Regulation • Grant/Proposal Writing • Cultural/Educational Fieldtrips • Youth Programming • Motivational Speaking • Program Development • Conferences/Retreats • NCE Test Workshops

 

LET Program

     Offered by Recco S. Richardson Consulting, Inc., the Licensure Educational Training (LET) Program is an effective supervisory program that targets Limited Licensed Professional Counselors (LLPCs) who need supervision.

 

LET Services:

 

Group Supervision: Monthly gatherings that review caseloads, offer Q/A sessions, discusses trends in the field, secures guest speakers and much more.

Individual Supervision: As requested, informal one-on-one sessions that provide personal attention, intentional brainstorming and insightful strategies.

Communication: Unlimited monthly communication via phone, email and text.

Other: NCE workshops, counseling residencies, business services support, book club and scholarly writing/research.

    Please contact our office if you are in need of LLPC supervision.  Currently, LET programming is offered in Bay City, Flint, and Lansing.

                              

Coming LLPC Group Supervision

 

July 2017

Bay City: Saturday, July 15, 2017 (9 am – 1 pm)

Lansing: Saturday, July 15, 2017 (4 pm – 8 pm)

Flint: Sunday, July 16, 2017 (1 pm – 5 pm).

 

August 2017

Bay City: Saturday, August 15, 2017 (9 am – 1 pm)

Lansing: Saturday, August 15, 2017 (4 pm – 8 pm)

Flint: Sunday, August 16, 2017 (1 pm – 5 pm).

 

 

Contact Us

 

Recco S. Richardson Consulting, Inc.      

Recco Santee Richardson, Ph.D., LPC                                           

2500 S Linden Road, P.O Box 321252 .. Flint, MI 48532                                

(810) 394-7815 (Office)  (810) 732-6657 (Fax)                                  

website: richardsonsconsulting.com                                 

email:reccorichardsonphd@gmail.com

 

20
Dec

May 2017

LET & ABLE News

Licensure Education Training & Adolescents for Better Learning Endeavors Programs

A publication of Recco S. Richardson Consulting, Inc. • Recco Santee Richardson, Ph.D., LPC

 

Issue 29 … May  2017

 

Dr. Recco’s Corner

    Well, the summer months are upon us. Like many of you, I plan to take full advantage of the weather, greater outdoors and time off work. Just the thought of the stated brings a smile to my face.

    For many, along with summer’s warm weather comes an increase in crime, family strain and misguided intentions by children, teens and adults. The stated does not bring a smile to my face.

    I’m taking the liberty and authority to decree and proclaim that summer 2017 will be a tremendous time of family, living, safety and mindfulness.

    I dare to say that a mere 10 dedicated and well versed individuals like you and I can change the trajectory and outcomes of the coming summer months experiences that the most at-risk and marginalized populations need as a time of hope and restoration.

    Will you stand with me in the liberty where with we have been set free and promote wholesome life experiences this summer for everyone that crosses our path?

 

Recco

Helping Male Teens Avoid Crime (Part I)

By Recco Santee Richardson, Ph.D., LPC

  Introduction

    Youth crime and violence is a problem in most societies. Children and adolescents take part in criminal activities for a number of reasons. At some point, they make an arbitrary decision to break the law as a result of buying into various stereotypes. The move towards crime by children/adolescents is also a result of their feeling marginalized in society and possibly being victims of abuse/neglect at some point.

    Lastly, criminal activity tends to follow children/adolescents who participate in sexual intercourse early in life (age 11), early experimentation with alcoholic beverages (age 11) and early exposure to gun violence (age 12).

    When exposed to ongoing family dysfunction, children/adolescents may struggle to do well in life and become involved in criminal activities (delinquent behaviors). Kumpfer (2010) reported that not only is it costly, but family dysfunction is the leading contributor to negative behaviors among adolescents.

    Other factors are peer influence, poor parenting skills and lack of parental involvement. These and other factors can ignite unhealthy behaviors like substance abuse, delinquency-criminal behavior, and early or unprotected sex.  

   There are a number of approaches to family interventions which proved to be effective in strengthening family systems and preventing family violence and behavioral or mental health problems in youth.

    As well, there are several strategies for decreasing dysfunction within the home such as regulating of leisure time, awareness, employment/cash, restorative justice and community based interventions.

 

Mental Health & Criminal Behavior

    Typically, children/adolescents diagnosed with mental health disorders such as Conduct Disorder, Oppositional Defiant disorder and Attention Deficit Hyper-Activity Disorder can be helped, thus avoiding possible future criminal activities and side-stepping antisocial behaviors.

    The stated childhood mental health disorders along with character flaws such as lying, stealing, vandalizing, bullying, and experimenting with drugs can lead to being convicted of a felony or misdemeanor. What is critical for parents and educators to realize and address is the fact that childhood mental health disorders often lead to school violence, incarceration, childhood/teen suicide, higher school dropout rates, etc.

    Criminal behavior (also referred to as antisocial behavior) is defined as an overall lack of adherence to the social morals and standards that allow members of a society to coexist peaceably.

    For children/adolescents the behaviors equate to delinquency that can trigger adulthood arrest, conviction or incarceration.

    Their poor mental health status, subsequent behaviors, propensity for violence and involvement in criminal activities can be traced back to environment, inconsistent parenting, lack of natural consequences, academic underachievement and genetics.  To be continued in next month’s newsletter

 

 

SAVE THE DATE

“A Closer Look” Mental Health & Service Provider’s Conference

    The 3rd Annual “A Closer Look” Mental Health & Service Provider’s Conference will be held Friday September 22, 2017 in Lansing, MI.

    Presenters will share information, interventions and practical insight regarding trauma, grief/loss, suicide prevention, treatment planning and emerging trends and other relevant topics.

    It is anticipated that four to seven (4-7) continuing education hours will be approved  by several professional certification boards.  

More conference details will be provided soon.

ABLE Program

    The Adolescents for Better Learning Endeavors (ABLE) Program is designed to help school age youth move forward as a result of gaining new skills and competency.

    The goal is for participants to be able to successfully participate within the school setting. The program helps participants improve their academics, social life, emotional maturity and decision-making skills.

 

ABLE Program Components:

 

  • Individual Counseling
  • Family Counseling
  • Home Visits
  • Crisis Management
  • Parenting Workshops
  • Incentives & Awards
  • Support Groups
  • Exciting Fieldtrips

 

Money For College

    The State of Michigan continues to offer the highly acclaimed Tuition Incentive Program (TIP). Established in 1997, the program encourages high school completion by providing tuition assistance for the first two years of college and beyond. There is a Phase I and Phase II of the program.

    Phase I covers enrollment in a certificate or Associate Degree program. Students must meet Medicaid eligibility history requirements, apply prior to high school graduation and complete the FAFSA.  For more information, contact our office or call TIP at 1-800-433-3243.

 

What Teens Wish Adults Knew About Parenting (Pt IV)

Excepts Taken From “Listen to me: A journey into the lives of today’s youth” (2009)

    This is the fourth and final part in our series on parenting.  Once again, we travel back and review what some typical Flint teens wrote about their fathers in 2009. The majority of young authors are now full-time college students and making a difference in the world and on campus.

 

By Deonte, 12th Grader

    Most people these days don’t have two parents that really care for them. I do and I really appreciate it. My appreciation is not because they provide for me and buy things for me. I value them for their teachings and the education in life that they give me. When it comes down to life, they want their offspring (me) to prosper. For this, I’m very thankful. They have raised me to succeed in life.

    My father and I have been through a lot of things together in our lives. I remember the first divorce and recently when he took me in when I had nowhere else to go. By him being there for me, I have developed into manhood. Our relationship can sometimes be seen as a respectful best friendship. We really get along. We both know when to draw the line and get down to business. Overall, my father (Otis Monroe Williams) and I have the strongest relationship that I have with anyone.

    Like any close relationship, we butt heads and have disagreements. We always have been able to work out our differences, which strengthens the relationship between the two of us.

    Our relationship is important to me because he really understands me and how I feel. He knows when to be real with me and when to make me feel good. He is important to me because sometimes he may be all I have. When I have problems and those around me turn their backs on me, my father is still there in every situation.

    In real relationships, there are always areas of improvement. I need for my father to listen to me more, hear what I have to say and understand how I feel about things. I also need him to agree with me more when certain things happen (i.e. my getting in trouble).

By Meosha, 10th Grader

    Young people, if you know your father, appreciate it. There are many people who don’t know their father and wish that they did. I’m one of those people who don’t know their father. I have never met him. I believe that not knowing my father does not affect me at this point in my life. Maybe in the future it will.

    If I ever get a chance to meet him, I would take it. I say this because there are a lot of things that a father can teach. He can teach me things that my mother can’t.

By Tarence, 10th Grader

    My relationship with my father is okay. Sometimes it is not the best, especially when we argue about stuff. I’m adopted and entered his life at 18 months of age. From this time until age 13, he was comfortable letting my adoptive mother play both parental roles. She usually taught me right from wrong and she gave out the punishments when I did something wrong.

    I can only think of one time that he speaks of punishing me when I did something wrong as a little child. Now that I’m 15 years old, he is getting more involved in my life and household affairs.

    He talks to me more and offers his advice. I respect him for this because he is the only father that I have. For most of my life, my biological father has been incarcerated.

    My father and I have a lot of things in common. We both like basketball, football and other sports. We can talk about sports for hours. He used to take me to sporting events, pick me up from practice and take me over to his friend’s home. He transported us everywhere so that my mother did not have to.

    I think he was her spy and reported to her our behaviors out in public. In his wisdom, he allowed my mother to handle our poor behaviors. For years, his favorite place was our garage. He loves going out there to relax.

    He can improve our relationship by helping me even more with my schoolwork. I also need more of his help at home. It would help me if he paid more attention to the family.

By Rani, 7th Grader

    My relationship with my father is very good. He is very easy to talk to. My father is a pretty easygoing guy. Most people cut me off when I’m talking, but he does not do this to me. He is very helpful and generous.

    Almost everything I ask for, I get it one way or another. That is unless my mother says no. His answer to everything is “Go ask your mother.” This makes me want to say, “Do you ever make decisions by yourself?”

    My relationship with him is important to me because I learn a lot from him. He teaches me about stuff that I don’t learn in school. He does not teach me about math, science or social studies. He talks to me and teaches me about the world.

    He makes sure I know what is going on in the world around me. I mean, don’t get me wrong, I like algebra, formulas and all the information that I learn about Africa. It is just that the things he teaches and talks to me about help shape my future more.

    He can help improve our relationship by treating me according to my age. What I mean is that my father and other adults always say, “You have to act your age to get treated your age.” I do this, but still get treated like I’m a kid.

    I get all A’s on my report card and have good behaviors at school. How else do I have to act? How old does he want me to act?

    I think what he has to realize is that I’m not his little girl anymore. I’m almost a teenager. He has to start treating me like a teenager. Please! I really don’t like being the only person at my school that does not have a cell phone.

    For some odd reason, my father (and mother) thinks that if I get a cell phone, my grades are going to hit the dirt. This is another one of their darned stereotypes. Man, I really hate those things.

By Jordan, 7th Grader

    My relationship with my father is wonderful. We get along very well. I’m grateful to have him. Most youth don’t have a father in the home. My father might get on my nerves, yet our relationship is still great. Actually our relationship is healthy.

    Because he spoils me most of the time, I feel like I use him to get what I want. I think it is this way because he is not home a lot. We don’t get many chances to argue. I trust him a lot.

    When I get into trouble with my mother, he knows how to calm her down and get me out of trouble. Like I said, I’m very grateful to have a father like him.

    My relationship with my father is important to me because it is good for me. He is special to me and I’m special to him. He works a job that he hates and works long hours just to bring home a paycheck, to buy food, to put a roof over my head and designer clothes on my back. I owe him.

    He is important to me. He would take a gun-shot for me. He is strong for me when I can’t be strong for myself. I don’t want to hurt him. When I observe other girls, their fathers don’t seem comfortable around them or their friends.

    My father and I can improve our relationship if he were to stop babying me. We need to move towards a more mature relationship. We also could improve our relationship by finding time to be with each other and the family. He is always at work and I don’t always see him. When he does come home, he usually goes to sleep. I know he is tired from working a 15-hour day.

    Sometimes I feel like he should just quit and find another job. They probably will lay him off in August or make him work some hours for no pay. What is the use of going to work and not getting paid for all of your time? If I were in his situation, I would quit and find a good-paying job with reasonable work hours so as to have time with my family. I know that it is not that easy for my father to just drop his job. I hope it all works out.

By Israel, 12th Grader

    My relationship with my father can be disturbing and abusive with a lot of arguing. I struggle with trusting him. The reason why I say that is because of the level of abuse me and my siblings have experienced in the past. I find myself needing to forgive because I don’t want to be the victim anymore. My relationship with my father is wasting away. This is because I’m in foster care. My relationship with him has become filled with anger, distrust and disgust.

    Due to his level of denial, I have a hard time liking him. When he does admit to various things, the next day he turns around and denies everything. This is difficult for me to deal with. I’m not sure if I can live with him again. His mental issues and problems leave us with unresolved issues that he refuses to discuss. He refers to our concerns as a fantasy because in his world most of our concerns never happened.

    My relationship with him is important because I need him to teach me how to be a man. I need to learn from him how to respect adults and how to treat women. Maybe he does not have these characteristics himself, thus he can’t teach or help me.  I don’t think he realizes how much I need and rely on him to teach me things. As a result I have been teaching myself things that he should teach me.

    Regardless, I still need his help. I need to have a relationship with him. This would help me become a respectful and independent adult. I want to have a good relationship with my father so that I can relate to other males that I meet.

    I can improve my relationship with him by talking about things with him. We can discuss his childhood, forgive each other and move on. He made his mistakes. I think I’m over everything. We both can learn from everything that has happened. We can learn to agree to disagree.

   I respect him but I don’t necessarily trust him. I’m not sure what he is capable of doing to me next time. I hope that everything will be resolved one day, even if he never admits some things.

By Aisha, 8th Grader

    My relationship with my father is good. We love each other and show it by not arguing. Actually we barely ever argue. We think about each other. For example if we were at the store without each other and saw an item of interest, we would get it for each other. I show him that I love him by folding his laundry. He shows his love by buying me things and cooking me breakfast.

    We have trust in each other. If I were to tell him something, I can trust that he would not tell other people or sabotage my life. He does not make a big deal out of things nor does he create problems. We play with each other and always hug. This happens while we are out to dinner or when we see each other in the house.

    My relationship with my father is important to me because I want to be able to talk with him about my problems. He actually listens and depending on the topic gives some good ideas. I want to be comfortable when I’m around him so that it does not feel weird.

    My father can improve our relationship by spending more time with me. I would like for him to play video games with me and take me places.

By Imani, 8th Grader

    My relationship with my dad is okay most of the time. It could be much better if he did not work so much and spend so much time with his girlfriend. His girlfriend is not mean and she makes some good lemonade. It is just that they spend too much time together. I’m starting to get jealous.

    Sometimes when we go to his house, we just watch television or he goes to his bedroom. We could be watching television at home. Anyway, I’m sort of happy because we are supposed to go bowling with him this week. If we go, I will not invite any of my friends to go. When my friends go with us, he always starts talking to them, especially my friends that are boys.

    My relationship with my father is important to me. I need a man in my life so that I don’t end up depending on other boys to take the place of my father. I also need him in my life because I need as many people as possible supporting me. It is important that he supports our family as much as he can. It’s not enough to just pay child support payment.

     He can improve our relationship by spending more time with me and hanging out with me. Right now my friends are closer to me than he is. They probably know more about me than he does. He could improve our relationship by calling me more. I need more than a once a week, brief call from him.  

    I think he could help my mother out a little bit more than he does. For example he could transport us to different places so that my mom can save her gas. He could start thinking about us more and not about himself all the time.

LET Program

    Offered by Recco S. Richardson Consulting, Inc., the Licensure Educational Training (LET) Program is an effective supervisory program that targets Limited Licensed Professional Counselors (LLPCs) who need supervision.

    Please contact our office if you are in need of LLPC supervision.  Currently, LET programming is offered in three cities and has regular participants from 10 different counties.

 

LET Services

 

Group Supervision: Monthly gatherings that review caseloads, offer Q/A sessions, discusses trends in the field, secures guest speakers and much more.

Individual Supervision: As requested, informal one-on-one sessions that provide personal attention, intentional brainstorming and insightful strategies.

Communication: Unlimited monthly communication via phone, email and text.

Other: NCE workshops, counseling residencies, business services support, book club and scholarly writing/research.

Services Offered By RSRC

 

Afterschool Programming • Staff Trainings/Development • Business/Entrepreneur Support Individual/Family Counseling • Research Institute • Book Writing/Publishing  Treatment/Support Groups • Educational Services • Post-Adoption Services • School-Based Initiatives • LLPC Licensure Supervision • Compliance/Regulation • Grant/Proposal Writing • Cultural/Educational Fieldtrips • Youth Programming • Motivational Speaking Program Development • Conferences/Retreats • NCE Test Workshops • Agency Clinical Directorship

 

Contact Us

                                         

Recco S. Richardson Consulting, Inc.      

Recco Santee Richardson, Ph.D., LPC                                           

2500 S Linden Road, P.O Box 321252 .. Flint, MI 48532                                

(810) 394-7815 (Office)  (810) 732-6657 (Fax)                                  

website: richardsonsconsulting.com                                 

email:reccorichardsonphd@gmail.com

20
Dec

April 2017

LET & ABLE News

Licensure Education Training & Adolescents for Better Learning Endeavors Programs

A publication of Recco S. Richardson Consulting, Inc. • Recco Santee Richardson, Ph.D., LPC

 

Issue 28 … April 2017

 

Dr. Recco’s Corner

    I’m becoming concerned! Concerned about the direction and needs of children as they try to navigate their K-6 education and the world around them.

    My concerns are validated on a daily basis when I talk with parents, educators, medical field professionals and clergy. In times past I (and others) were quick to say that the solution is “better parenting.” That is not my stance any longer.

    For the children that I’m most concerned about, the solution is village parenting, structure, natural and loving consequences,  internal/external motivators, access to effective services and wholesome nurturing that are all provided by parents and a host of caring adults.

    Every child is precious and special. All they need sometimes is for someone like you and I to stand and do something on their behalf.

    As I stated in last month’s newsletter in this very column, I need as many caring adults as possible to stand with me. For the next 60 days, can I depend on you to stand? Stand and make a difference in the life of your child, somebody’s child, any child or a lost child?

Recco

 

Does Your Elementary Age Child Need Behavior Day Treatment?

By Recco Santee Richardson, Ph.D., LPC

    Does your young child (age 7-12) need a 45 day intensive and impactful treatment program that is prevention/intervention in nature? Before you answer, be aware that all over America, there is a need for “non-residential” behavior day treatment programming for children.  

    The need exists because earlier and earlier, ordinary children are experiencing increased stressors, on-going school referrals/suspensions, traumatic life changes, mental health issues, defiance towards adults, relationship problems, anger and home life problems.  

    Parents, feel comfortable knowing that you are not alone. There are hundreds of parents who are struggling with raising their young child.  You should know that successful behavior day treatment programs have the ability to enhance participants’ emotional healthiness, sense of direction, self-love and bond/attachment.

    In most communities, there is a growing number of children who are at-risk of abuse, neglect, violence, underachievement, slow processing and engagement and questionable behaviors. More than ever, today’s children are given to poor decision making, anger, depression, low confidence, isolation and trauma.  

    As a result, parents should re-think the need to place their child in a behavior day treatment program.  Quality programs successfully help youth build solid relationships, cope with conflict,  communicate effectively, express themselves, heal from emotional pain, address issues of loss/grief, be inspired to dream, gain a support system and feel safe.

Last Call For RSRC 3rd Annual Recharge Self Care Conference

    The 3rd Annual Recharge Service Providers Self Care Conference is right around the corner. The conference will be held Saturday April 29, 2017 at Covenant Hills Retreat & Camp, Otisville, MI.

    The morning workshop sessions (which are approved by National Board of Certified Counselors for three CE units) will be held 8 am – 11:30 am. The afternoon workshop sessions will be held 1 pm – 4:30 pm. The cost is $100 for each session.  

    Registration began March 1, 2017. To register/pay on-line, visit the web page http://www.richardsonsconsulting.com/recharge/.

    The registration form and payment can be mailed to Recco S. Richardson Consulting, Inc., 2500 S. Linden Road, P.O. Box 321252, Flint, MI 48532.

CE Units & Self Care Conference

    The morning session of the “Recharge” Service Providers Self Care Conference (Self-Care, the Pursuit of Happiness & Helping Others session only) has been approved by the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC) for three (3) NBCC credits.

 

What Teens Wish Adults Knew About Parenting (Pt III) 

Excepts Taken From “Listen to me: A journey into the lives of today’s youth” (2009)

    This is the third part in our series on parenting. We are going back in time and reviewing what some typical Flint teens wrote about their mothers in 2009. The majority of young authors are now full-time college students and making a difference in the world and on campus.

By Lilly, 10th Grader

    My relationship with my mother is strong. We get along very well. We shop, go to the movies and have fun together. She is like the mother I always wanted. She is a mother that loves me and treats me like a spoiled brat.

    My relationship with her is important to me because she takes good care of me. We take care of each other even during hard times or in sickness. When she has something on her mind that needs to be said, we go for a ride or go see a movie. This helps take the pain away. If I have a problem with someone, I go to my mother about it. She is there for me.

    She can help improve our relationship by trusting me more. I know in a mother’s blood they feel that if they trust too much, their daughter will do something dumb.  I have done enough dumb things to last a life time. Yet, my mother continues to love me and believe in me.

By Meosha, 10th Grader

    My relationship with my mother is much different than the one I have with my father. My mother is very loving, strong and understanding. Our relationship is important to me because I would be nowhere in life without her.

    I can’t see myself being raised by another woman. I say this because if my mother would not have taken me into her life and adopted me, I could still be in foster care going from home to home. She is the only mother that I know. I would not have it any other way.

    I believe my mother could improve our relationship by listening to me, being even more understanding and trusting me. I believe that our relationship is good. It could be better if these three areas improved. I really believe that if she trusted me more, our relationship would flourish.

    The problems that I have caused in our relationship have broken her trust. I have stolen from her. I have lied to her. I know it may take some time to restore her trust.

By Asia, 8th Grader

    My birth mother lost her parental rights. After living with her for years, my foster mother eventually adopted me. Ever since her decision, we have had a close relationship.  

    She is a loving person and protects me from all harm. Today our relationship features us caring for each other. She cares for me and she would risk her life for me. I now realize how much she does for me. For example, when she goes to the grocery store she buys chips, brownies, cupcakes and other sweets even though she does not eat junk food. She also spends a lot of her money on my shoes and clothes.

    The relationship with my adoptive mother is important to me because she means so much to me. When I’m sad, she shows how much she loves me. When I need her support the most, she provides it. We will always be together.

    She can improve our relationship by giving me more freedom and not treating me like a baby. She could also stop yelling and calm down some.

By Tarence, 10th Grader

    I have a close relationship with my adoptive mother. To me, for years she was the head of the household. Once my dad retired, she continued to work. Now, she is still active in the home and in my life.

    She helps me with my homework, gives me an allowance and distributes most of the discipline that I need. We talk about everything, laugh together and play with each other. Her advice is pretty good and she protects me.

    My relationship with my adoptive mother is important to me. She is special to me. She takes good care of me even though she is not my biological mother. I love her for this.

By Rani, 7th Grader

    My relationship with my mother is interesting. We get along as long as I don’t talk. She is not as easy to talk to as my father is. I think the problem is that we are both very smart and bright. We are too much alike and we both think we are always right. When I say something that she thinks is wrong, she jumps on me.  Most of the time (like 99 percent of the time) she is right. However, that other 1 percent of the time, I’m right.

    Sometimes, my mother falsely accuses me. When she finds out that I’m innocent, she tries to make it up to me. I’m just sick of it.

    My relationship with her is important to me because I’m going to need someone to lean on later in life. College is tough and I probably will need someone I can really trust. Who would be better to trust than the person that changed my diapers? You know, my relationship with my mother is also important because she is not going to live forever.

    Every time we watch a movie, go to the mall or listen to my kind of music, I end up getting some type of lecture or speech out of it. My mom says it is for my own good. I say that all it is doing is getting on my nerves or putting me to sleep.  Sometimes I feel like she is just wasting her breath because I’m a very good “false” listener. This is really a good skill to have.

    I have learned to sit and gaze into her eyes, tuning her out all the time. During one of her lectures what I will do is think about school or politics. It works like a charm.

    My mother can help improve our relationship by quitting jumping to conclusions. For example, if she sees me cleaning my room she automatically thinks I’m doing it for some sort of reward. More stereotypes, is all it is. Sometimes I clean my room because I want to and out of the goodness of my heart.

By Jordan, 7th Grader

    My relationship with my mother is challenging. I feel like it is getting harder and harder to impress her or to make her happy. Her rules are stricter than my father’s rules, thus I have to behave a certain way around my mother and then a different way in front of my father.

    Sometimes my mother and I have our moments when we argue. I get angry when we argue because I can’t say what I really want to. All of the unspeakable words get held up inside and the situation gets worse. I feel like my relationship with my mother often features arguing.

  The relationship is successful most of the time. We laugh and joke around with each other. I sometimes wonder when we are laughing, if we are going to end up arguing in the next few minutes.

    My relationship with my mother is important because I will need her throughout my life. I look at the relationship that my mother has with her mother. I don’t think they have a good relationship. Over time, they are getting along better.  My mother really does not talk to my grandmother.

    When she needs to talk to someone, she will call her sister or her best friend. The only time she talks to my grandmother is when she needs her to watch me and my brother. I honestly don’t want that type of relationship with my mother.

    I want to be able to call or visit her when I need some “woman to woman” advice. We might have our ups and downs, just as long as we still love each other.

    My mother could improve our relationship by trusting me. She could also listen more and make an effort to understand what I’m trying to say. Like when I try to tell her something from my heart.

    She always has a comment to say about it. I take her comment as being critical of me. I really desire for her to be more of a friend when I need her to be. This request might sound complicated but it is really not that hard to do.

    Right now I feel like I can’t go to her and tell her everything. I really want to learn how to trust her and how to keep her from getting mad at me. It seems like getting angry is mother’s nature. I guess I will just have to get used to it.

By Deonte, 12th Grader

    My mother and I have a great relationship. She is a nice person who understands. Even though it seems like we don’t see each other that often, we have maintained a good relationship. We both love each other unconditionally.

    My relationship with her is important to me because she created me into what I am today. She raised me up until I was 13 years old.

    Our relationship would improve if she were to spend more time with me and be there for me. I don’t want to ask to do these things, I want her to do it on her own will. Our relationship would improve if she were to ask me more questions about who I am and if she made more effort to get to know me.

    I see my step-mom as a second mom. She and I can really have fun together. We also learn a lot about each other and from each other. She teaches me about life. Our relationship has ups and downs. We have our share of little conflicts and we get angry with each other. We have learned to work things out in a positive manner.

    My relationship with her is important to me because she really cares and means what she says. She is a very comfortable person to be around and she is a great listener. She could improve our relationship by being more understanding, living more off facts than opinions and allowing me to express my feelings.

By Aisha, 8th Grader

    My relationship with my mother is loving. We give each other hugs and kisses before we go to bed. We laugh and play together. We go places to talk and just the two of us hang out.  My relationship with my mother is important because I want to share things with her. Since she is a female and has completed school, there are lots of good ideas and information she can give me. When she helps me, I don’t have to worry as much. I really can’t think of ways that my mother can improve our relationship. We are very close. If anything, I’m the one that can do various things to improve our relationship.

By Imani, 8th Grader

    My mother and I have an okay relationship. It could be better. When I’m at home, we always argue. It is kind of surprising as to what we will argue about each day. When I get tired of hearing her argue, I just say, “Okay mom” so that she will stop talking and think that she is right.

    Our relationship is important to me because I want more privileges. I want to be able to do things with my friends. Most importantly, I don’t want to be in trouble all the time. It is important that we get along because I have to live with her until I move out. I have decided to make the best of living with my mother.

She can improve our relationship by listening to me more, trusting me and not caring about stuff that is not necessary.

 

20 Adult “Truths” To Live By

By Recco Santee Richardson, Ph.D., LPC

 

Believe in yourself no matter what.

Opportunity knocks more than once.

Hard work still pays off.

Keep your future plans close to your heart.

Forgive quickly and often.

 

Accept that fear is part of the process.

It’s never too late to say thank you.

Use your words carefully and with purpose.

Do it yourself because help may never come.

Everything you do matters and counts.

 

Trust that you don’t have to trust everyone.

Start where you can, while you can.

What is yours will find its way to you.

There is nothing wrong with apologizing

Save enough energy for the important battles.

 

Failure is not permanent or a crime.

Dreams still do come true.

It is only a problem if you allow it to be.

Imperfections are necessary and to be valued.

At all times, remember what is important.

 

ABLE Program

    The Adolescents for Better Learning Endeavors (ABLE) Program is designed to help school age youth move forward as a result of gaining new skills and competency.

    The goal is for participants to be able to successfully participate within the school setting. The program helps participants improve their academics, social life, emotional maturity and decision-making skills.

ABLE Program Components:

  • Individual Counseling
  • Family Counseling
  • Home Visits
  • Crisis Management
  • Parenting Workshops
  • Incentives & Awards
  • Support Groups
  • Exciting Fieldtrips

 

LET Program

    Offered by Recco S. Richardson Consulting, Inc., the Licensure Educational Training (LET) Program is an effective supervisory program that targets Limited Licensed Professional Counselors (LLPCs) who need supervision.

    Please contact our office if you are in need of LLPC supervision. The benefits of participation are tremendous and sure to positively impact your life.

    Currently, LET programming is offered in three cities and has regular participants from 10 different counties.

LET Services:

Group Supervision: Monthly gatherings that review caseloads, offer Q/A sessions, discusses trends in the field, secures guest speakers and much more.

Individual Supervision: As requested, informal one-on-one sessions that provide personal attention, intentional brainstorming and insightful strategies.

Communication:  Unlimited monthly communication via phone, email and text.

Other: NCE workshops, counseling residencies, business services support, book club and scholarly writing/research.

Coming LLPC Group Supervision

 

April 2017

For this month, supervision sessions for all cohorts will take place during the Recharge Service Providers“ Self Care”  Conference on Saturday, April 29, 2017 from 8 am to 11:30 am. Make up sessions will be available 1 pm to 5 pm.

 

May 2017

Bay City: Saturday, May 20, 2017 (9 am – 1 pm)

Lansing: Saturday, May 20, 2017 (4 pm – 8 pm)

Flint: Sunday, May 21, 2017 (1 pm – 5 pm).

 

June 2017

Bay City: Saturday, June 17, 2017 (9 am – 1 pm)

Lansing: Saturday, June 17, 2017 (4 pm – 8 pm)

Flint: Sunday, June 18, 2017 (1 pm – 5 pm).

 

Contact Us

Recco S. Richardson Consulting, Inc.

Recco Santee Richardson, Ph.D., LPC

2500 S Linden Road, P.O Box 321252 .. Flint, MI 48532

(810) 394-7815 (Office)  (810) 732-6657 (Fax)

website: richardsonsconsulting.com

email:reccorichardsonphd@gmail.com

 

 

 

20
Dec

January 2017

LET & ABLE News

Licensure Education Training & Adolescents for Better Learning Endeavors Programs

A publication of Recco S. Richardson Consulting, Inc. • Recco Santee Richardson, Ph.D., LPC

Issue 26 … January 2017

Dr. Recco’s Corner

      There are positives and negatives associated with living in America’s capitalist society. As a positive, we have the opportunity to excel, venture out and pursue dreams. This is a God send concept. Likewise, as a negative, we must deal with the presence of competitiveness, policies and social status that is annoying and evil.

    It is capitalism that creates and gives rise to various isms and stereotypes. This leads me to wonder why children from single parent homes are often stereotyped and perceived in some circles, to be a step-down from other homes.  

   Countless single parent home children have recounted to me horror stories about how their friends treat them because of their home life. It is concerning to me how single parent home children (which accounts for upwards of 60 percent of children in some communities and school districts) are subject to negative stereotypes. Any time the majority of a sect of people is stereotyped, eventually types of legalized oppression follows and further suffocates the victims.  

    As health and human services working professionals, it is our responsibility to cry loud against any form of oppression and stereotypes. Are you ready to cry and battle?

Recco

“Two Parents and Single Parent Homes, Life Outcomes of Their Children” 

Recco Santee Richardson, Ph.D., LPC (2016)

Part IV “Building Resiliency in Children Reared In Single Parent Home II

Resilience Frameworks

    Over the past 40 years, resilience research has gone through several stages. From an initial focus on the invulnerable or invincible child, psychologists began to recognize that much of what seems to promote resilience originates outside of the individual. This led to a search for resilience factors at the individual, family, community and cultural levels (Lee, Cheng & Kwong, 2012).

    Contemporary researchers have found that resilience factors vary in different risk contexts and have contributed to the notion that resilience is a process. Research on resilience has been a major theme in developmental psychopathology focusing on the question why some children and adolescents maintain positive adaptation  despite experiences of “distressing life conditions and demanding societal conditions”  such as violence, poverty, stress, trauma, deprivation, and oppression (Lee, Cheng & Kwong, 2012).

    Children from single parent homes experience the stated and are more at-risk than other children to school dropout, illness, lower standardized test scores, substance abuse, shorter life span and incarceration.

    Three waves of research on resilience have been identified and have set the path for the fourth wave which focuses on multilevel analysis and the dynamics of adaptation and change. There is a wide range of theories about the relationships between resilience and positive youth development. 

    There are models and frameworks that help to better understand resilience. As such, it is held that there are three general classes of resilience models/frameworks (compensatory, protective, and challenge) that explain how resilience factors operate to alter the trajectory from risk exposure to negative outcome (Fergus &Zimmerman, 2005).

Compensatory: The compensatory model best explains a situation where a resilience factor counteracts or operates in an opposite direction to a risk factor. The resilience factor has a direct effect on the outcome, one that is independent of the effect of the risk factor. In CIET’s ACYRN-East study, for example, alcohol abstinence or moderation is compensatory in the sense that it is directly and independently associated with lower risk for youth suicide (Anderson & Ledogar, 2008).

Protective: In the protective model, assets or resources moderate or reduce the effects of a risk on a negative outcome. Protective factors may operate in several ways to influence outcomes. They may help to neutralize the effects of risks; they may weaken, but not completely remove them; or they may enhance the positive effect of another protective factor in producing an outcome.

    In the ACYRN-East study (Anderson & Ledogar, 2008), being drug-free, though not directly associated with lower suicide risk, is associated with lower alcohol use and thus is protective in the sense that it enhances the latter’s anti-suicide potential.

Challenge: A third model of resilience is the challenge model. In this model, the association between a risk factor and an outcome is “curvilinear”: exposures to both low and high levels of a risk factor are associated with negative outcomes, but moderate levels of the risk are related to less negative (or positive) outcomes.

    Altering the trajectory and impact of risk and negative outcomes is just what the doctor ordered for children reared in single parent homes. To strengthen children, we must consistently redirect and change the trajectory and bloodline issues that target them.     

    Adolescents exposed to moderate levels of risk, for example, may be confronted with enough of the risk factor to learn how to overcome it but are not exposed to so much of it that overcoming it is impossible.

Risk, Vulnerability & Protective Factors

    With the help of resilience, the majority of children can overcome their initial traumatic life experiences. Types of traumatic experiences include growing up in the home with a mentally ill family member, residing in a divorced or blended family home, being emotionally, physically or sexually abused or having criminally involved parents.

    Not many children escape life without experiencing some type of trauma. It behooves us to ensure that through resilience, quality parenting and proper guidance, a faulty bond with their trauma does not take place

    As stated previously in this four part research writing, the common qualifying condition for resilience, as viewed by most researchers, is the presence of demonstrable, substantial risk facing the individual. Many define risk in terms of statistical probabilities: a high-risk condition being one that carries high odds for maladjustment (Luthar, 2006Masten, 2001).

    Substantial risk is closely related to vulnerability. Vulnerability can be defined as how prepared a person is for a presented task. Vulnerability can interact with a risk factor so as to intensify one’s reaction to risk (Rutter, 1990Luthar, 19912006).

    There are many kinds of vulnerabilities including economic, social, environmental and psychological. Indigenous, rural and urban communities often have to deal with their own particular set of vulnerabilities.

    The identification of risk, vulnerability and protective factors is important because risk factors can have a greater effect when occurring together with other risk factors than they do when occurring in isolation (Rutter, 199019992000Sameroff et al., 1987Sameroff & Rosenblum, 2006). Protective factors will be discussed later in this writing.

    The identification of vulnerability factors helps to understand, find processes, view causes and identify solutions.

Protective Factors & Children

    The main difference between individuals who adapt very well despite facing risks and individuals who end up in mal-adaptation is the existence of protective factors. In summary, protective factors are internal and external ideas and concepts that can help  individuals negotiate live experiences that have the ability to stymie development, offset growth and deter success.

    Regardless of what type of home they reside in, protective factors are critical and play a major role in the overall development of children. Why? Because protective factors can help children develop, adapt to stressful situations and side-step risk taking behaviors.

    In general, internal protective factors have the ability to promote optimism, perceptions of control, self-efficacy, and active coping skills that are associated with better health. External protective factors help individual’s function socially and maximize their participation in their environment.

     Protective factors can be grouped into four main components (bonding, competence, optimism and environment).

Bonding: Bonding explains a child’s emotional attachment and commitment to parents or caregivers. Healthy and unhealthy bonding can be found in all relationships including peer, coach, love interests and community groups. To promote bonding and attachment with and within children, simply spend quality time with them, explain universal truths to them, practice acceptance and mercy with them, communicate with them about relevant age appropriate topics and give them opportunities to explore and express themselves to and with you. The stated is “Parenting 101” in a nutshell.

Competence: In general competence can be viewed as the by-product of knowledge and intelligence. It is a must for children to have. Specifically, emotional, cognitive, moral, behavioral and social competencies help all children (especially those raised in a single parent home) secure the ability to make good decisions, regulate their emotions, have a proper view of themselves, and get along with others. When the throws of life come, children must have access to reservoirs of competencies so as to overcome and keep moving forward.

Optimism: A jewel in its own right, optimism is the ability to hope against hope. It is the presence of a resilient mindset that embraces the belief that one way or another, things will work out. Optimism has been known to have solid roots in spiritual truths, understanding the meaning of life and possessing a positive sense of self. It has the ability to promote a “future orientation” approach to life that helps children stay focused on a desired goal. Cultural enrichment and exposure to other’s ways of life can help all children experience optimism and future orientations.

Environment: Of all the protective factors, environment tends to have the largest impact on children. It takes dedication, unrelenting effort, a strong sense of self and acceptance to break negative bands created by unhealthy environments. The most common environments that effect children to the positive and negative are home, school and community.

    In closing, in case you missed it, the treatment plan or actions steps necessary for helping children raised in single parent homes achieve and close life outcomes gaps is a process.

    The process includes ensuring that each child secures and maximizes protective factors, bonds with healthy experiences and develops a resilient mindset.

 

RSRC 2nd Annual Recharge Self Care Conference

     Our 2nd Annual Recharge Service Providers Self Care Conference will be held Saturday April 29, 2017 at Covenant Hills Retreat & Camp, Otisville, MI.

     The morning workshop sessions will be held 8 am – 12 noon and the afternoon workshop sessions will be held 2 pm – 5 pm. The cost is $100 for each session.

     A total of four to six interactive and rejuvenating workshops will be offered along with a private practice panel.

ABLE Program

    The Adolescents for Better Learning Endeavors (ABLE) Program is designed to help school age youth move forward as a result of gaining new skills and competency.

The goal is for participants to be able to successfully participate within the school setting.

    The program helps participants improve their academics, social life, emotional maturity and decision making skills.

 

ABLE Program Components:

 

  • Individual Counseling
  • Family Counseling
  • Home Visits
  • Crisis Management
  • Parenting Workshops
  • Incentives & Awards
  • Support Groups
  • Exciting Fieldtrips

 

Coming RSRC Trainings/Workshops

 

Saturday, February 4, 2017

Topic: “Sweet Lips” Communication Workshop

Time: 11am – 2 pm

Location: Harris Memorial C.O.G.I. C, Flint, MI

Cost: $10 (ages 12 and under) $20 (Adults)

Status: Open to general public

Presenter: Recco Santee Richardson, Ph.D., LPC

 

Wednesday February 8, 2017

Topic: Them, They & Us: Staff Diversity and Unity

Time: 6 pm – 8 pm

Location: Uniquely Created Children’s Center

Cost: None

Status: Open to general public

Presenter: Recco Santee Richardson, Ph.D., LPC

 

Sunday, February 19, 2017

Topic: Emotional Development of Teens & Young Adults

Time: 7 am – 10 am

Location: Genesee Valley Regional Center

Cost: None

Status: Closed to general public

Presenter: Recco Santee Richardson, Ph.D., LPC

 

Tuesday, February 21, 2017

Topic: Emotional Development of Teens & Young Adults

Time: 6 pm – 9 pm

Location: Genesee Valley Regional Center

Cost: None

Status: Closed to general public

Presenter: Recco Santee Richardson, Ph.D., LPC

 

Note: The target audience for the workshops are all parents, day care workers, case managers, counselors, social workers, family advocates, coaches, educators, court family workers, grant writers, youth specialist, interns, volunteers and residential staff.

 

LET Program

    Offered by Recco S. Richardson Consulting, Inc., the Licensure Educational Training (LET) Program is an effective supervisory program that targets Limited Licensed Professional Counselors (LLPCs) who need supervision.

    Currently, LET programming is offered in three cities and has regular participants from 10 different counties

LET Services:

Group Supervision: Monthly gatherings that review caseloads, offer Q/A sessions, discusses trends in the field, secures guest speakers and much more.

Individual Supervision: As requested, informal one-on-one sessions that provide personal attention, intentional brainstorming and insightful strategies.

Communication: Unlimited monthly communication via phone, email and text.

Other: NCE workshops, counseling residencies, business services support, book club and scholarly writing/research.

 

Coming LLPC Group Supervision

 

February 2017

Bay City: Saturday, February 18, 2017 (9 am – 1 pm)

Lansing: Saturday, February 18, 2017 (4 pm – 8 pm)

Flint: Sunday, February 19, 2017 (1 pm – 5 pm)

 

March 2017

Bay City: Saturday, March 18, 2017 (9 am – 1 pm)

Lansing: Saturday, March 18, 2017 (4 pm – 8 pm)

Flint: Sunday, March 19, 2017 (1 pm – 5 pm)

 

Services Offered By RSRC

 

Afterschool Programming • Treatment/Support Groups • Staff Trainings                        Book Writing/Publishing • Entrepreneur Support • Educational Services • Family Counseling • Compliance/Regulation • Post-Adoption Services • Youth Programming School-Based Initiatives • Grant/Proposal Writing • NCE Test Workshops • Educational Fieldtrips • Program Development • Motivational Speaking • Conferences/Retreats        501c(3) Application • LLPC Licensure Supervision

 

Contact Us

                                         

Recco S. Richardson Consulting, Inc.      

Recco Santee Richardson, Ph.D., LPC                                           

2500 S Linden Road, P.O Box 321252 .. Flint, MI 48532                                

(810) 394-7815 (Office)  (810) 732-6657 (Fax)                                  

website: reccorichardsonconsulting.com                                 

email:reccorichardsonphd@gmail.com